What does a registered manager at a children’s care home do?

 

 

 

 

Great article from the Guardian, interviewing Zoey Lees, who is a registered manager at The Orchards, a children’s care home in Nottingham for five young people aged 11 to 18 who are on the autism spectrum:

We are just like a family and my day starts about 8am when I transport some of the children to school. Then I come back and do health and safety checks, paperwork and look at the rotas.

We have 21 members of staff so I do staff supervision, for example, go over some things with them and provide the opportunity for reflective practice. I also look at how we can move the service forward and the different schemes we could become involved in. It’s important to tackle the stigma surrounding learning disabilities, which is why community participation is vital. We start collecting the children from school at about 2pm. My attitude is that I can’t talk to staff about working with a young person if I don’t work with the child myself, so I do a lot of observational work.

We have a variety of after-school activities, such as music and Zumba; some children go skating, make contact with their family or go to Scouts. We want to teach children life skills, so they help make the evening meal, which we eat together at about 5.30pm.

After dinner, children choose their own activities until we get ready for bedtime; we may read a book with the child or talk about the events of the day, maybe give a hand massage to emphasise that we are winding down. The youngest child goes to bed at 7.30pm, the oldest at 10pm. I leave about 6pm, but I’m always on call.

Safeguarding update from Hampshire Constabulary

Please be aware of the attached further update from Hampshire Constabulary

Dear Parents,

You may be aware of an explicit video involving two children which has been shared far and wide on social media and has been in the news this week.

Hampshire Constabulary has conducted a thorough investigation into these matters and a man has been charged with inciting a female aged 13-15 years to engage in sexual activity, making an indecent photograph of a child and distributing an indecent photograph of a child.

Both children, who are victims of serious crime, are being supported by specialist police officers and partner agencies. As these legal proceedings are ongoing, I would like to remind people not to speculate – especially on social media – as it may compromise the investigation.

The advice from the police remains the same, if children and young people receive this video on any social media platform, be it Snapchat, Instagram, WhatsApp or any other channel – they should delete it immediately and tell a trusted adult – a teacher or parent for example.

It’s really important that they understand that if they show this video to someone else or forward it on to other people, they could be committing a crime and we want to stop that happening. We have been clear that we do not want to criminalise children and that people won’t be in trouble if they’ve made a genuine mistake.

Sadly, we are seeing more offences where young people are being targeted by offenders who conceal their identities, and know where to go online to access and strike up false friendships with children and unfortunately, no one is immune to the dangers. Please discuss this with your children and encourage them to talk to you or another trusted adult if they have any worries or concerns. They can also call ChildLine if they really don’t feel comfortable talking to someone face-to-face.

If you have any concerns about the safety of your children online or would like to know more, there is further support and advice for children and parents available on the CEOP website http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/

Detective Superintendent Rachel Farrell Hampshire Constabulary

Hampshire detectives charge man following investigation into online sexual offences

Hampshire Constabulary have released a statement about a local investigation into online sexual offences:

Officers from the child abuse investigation team at Hampshire Constabulary have charged a man in connection with an investigation into online sexual offences.

Daniel Norton, from Cheadle, in Stockport, has been charged with the following –

  • Three counts of inciting a female aged 13-15 years to engage in sexual activity
  • Three counts of making an indecent photograph of a child
  • One count of distributing an indecent photograph of a child

The 25-year-old is due to appear at Southampton Magistrates Court later today (Wednesday, December 6).

If you are concerned that a child you know has been a victim of online child sexual abuse, report directly to CEOP via the ClickCEOP reporting button –www.ceop.police.uk. If you would like to understand more about keeping children safe from online sexual abuse, please visit CEOP’s Thinkuknow website  – www.thinkuknow.co.uk.

Additional support for children who don’t feel able to talk to a trusted adult is available from ChildLine on 0800 1111.

Hampshire Constabulary Launches Firearms Surrender

The surrender is giving people the chance to hand in any firearms or ammunition which have come into their possession for whatever reason.

The surrender runs from today (November 13) until Sunday, November 26 and is part of national initiative run by the National Ballistics Intelligence Service (NABIS). It aims to reduce the number of illegally held firearms within our communities.

Each firearm handed into the Police is one less that could fall into the hands of criminals.  Whether it is an old family heirloom that has been stored away for years, a former military weapon or an unwanted firearm which was previously legally owned – all can be handed in to your local police station, safe in the knowledge that they will be disposed of safely.

Hampshire Constabulary will also accept replica firearms, air weapons, BB guns, imitation firearms, antique guns, component parts and other ballistic items.

During the fortnight firearms licence holders are also being encouraged to consider the surrender of weapons they no longer have any use for.

 

During the two-week campaign, those surrendering firearms will not face prosecution for the illegal possession upon surrender and can remain anonymous.  However, this is not an amnesty and if further examination of a surrendered firearm reveals a link to a crime, this will be investigated.

Hampshire Constabulary are asking anyone who is unsure about an item they have to call them on 101 to get advice on what they should do.  Alternatively, you can call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Historic ordnance should not be moved or handed in to any stations, if you think you have any items like this, please call Hampshire Constabulary on 101 for advice.

Please click here for a list of which stations will be taking part in the surrender.

Want to join the Hampshire & Isle of Wight Youth Commission?

The Hampshire Police and Crime Commissioner, Michael Lane, is seeking volunteers aged between 14 and 25 years old to help give young people a voice on the crime and policing issues that matter to them most.

The purpose of the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Youth Commission is to make young people part of the solution to tackling crime and improving policing, rather than being seen as part of the problem. It is made up of up to 50 young people aged between 14 and 25.

The Youth Commission currently has four priorities:
• Mental Health
• Hate Crime
• Cyber Safety
• Unhealthy Relationships

Youth Commission members identify the issues that young people are concerned about most and gather opinions on what the specific concerns are and ideas on how to tackle them. They also work to raise awareness and educate young people via campaigns, such as this year’s #GoFISH cyber safety campaign, run workshops, speak at events and take part in a range of other activities.

Members of the Youth Commission gain a variety of skills, meet and work with a range of people, learn about different issues that are relevant to them and their peers and get to be part of some great youth orientated events – this year members have attended festivals, youth conferences and summer activity schemes.

If you are interested is applying (or know someone that maybe interested) then please complete the online application form by 03 November 2017 which can be found here . This is the first part of the two stage application process.

Applicants that reach the second stage will be invited to an assessment evening week commencing 20th November. Applicants with experience of the police and criminal justice systems, as an offender, victim or any other interaction are welcome to apply.

Award in Community Development

Are you involved in volunteer or paid community development work?  This is a chance to gain skills and share ideas and experiences with other people and earn a certificate.

The course is suitable both for people who are volunteers or who are just starting out in a community development role, leading to a CPD certificate at Level 2 or even Level 3. The Level 3 is suitable to people with existing experience as a community development worker.

Six Friday sessions – 9.45 – 2.45pm:

  • 12, 19 January
  • 2, 9 and 23 February
  • 2 March

at the Swaythling Neighbourhood Centre, off Broadlands Road, Southampton, SO17 3AT

Fees depend on your income. For more information or to book please call 023 8067 1111  or email  ichambers@twics.org.uk

Halloween – No Trick or Treat

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If you do not want to be disturbed by trick or treaters this Halloween, download and print out a copy of the “No Trick Or Treat” poster by Hampshire Constabulary to display by your front door.

Every year Hampshire Constabulary’s force control room receives calls from people who have been frightened or disturbed by trick or treaters in Hampshire and the Isle of Wight.

Some advice for the elderly or vulnerable members of our community staying home this Halloween:

  • If you do not know who is calling at your house, you do not need to open the door.
  • Try to see who is at the door by looking through a spy hole or window before opening the door.
  • If you have a chain on your door – keep this in place when opening the door.
  • If you feel threatened in your home, please contact the police.

Polichampshire-constabulary-no-trick-or-treate advice to children and their parents is to be mindful that some of the more vulnerable or elderly members of the community do not wish to participate in Halloween activities and in fact may feel intimidated by groups of people calling at their doors.

Hampshire Constabulary has prepared some advice for children and their parents:

  • If your child is going outside in a costume – make sure they are wearing reflective clothing or add reflective tape to their clothes.
  • Carry a torch and consider road safety at all times.
  • If your child is going out trick or treating – make sure they go out in a group, preferably accompanied by an adult.
  • Older children should let you know where they are going and what time they will be back.
  • Children should carry a mobile phone in a pocket or bag.
  • Make sure your children know not to enter anyone’s house or to accept lifts from strangers.

Youth & Community Worker vacancies in the New Forest

Handy%20Trust%20Logo
The Handy (Hythe and Dibden Youth) Trust, who we partner closely with, have two vacancies to join their team, one for a role in Fawley, and one for a role in Marchwood:

Job Vacancy – HANDY Trust: Youth and Community Worker – Fawley

Salary Scale JNC Youth & Community Worker £17,041 pa pro rata

Entry to Local Government Pension Scheme (After qualifying period) 

This post is an opportunity to work alongside and focus on young people in the parish of Fawley planning, delivering and evaluating a wide range of youth & community work. We are interested in hearing from people who are team players with positive attitudes, who have energy, commitment and creativity to motivate young people to learn new skills and develop their abilities.

The post is for 16 hours per week, which are to be worked flexibly. The worker will need to consult with all local young people to establish their needs and then work in partnership to set up and run activities including twice weekly youth session in term time and every day in the school holidays alongside a team of recruited volunteers.

This role includes working evenings and weekends as and when required. All applicants need a recognised youth work qualification and must be prepared to undertake an enhanced DBS check.
Click on the links below for job description and application form
Click Here to download Job Description

Click Here to download Application Form

Job Vacancy – HANDY Trust: Youth and Community Worker – Marchwood

Salary Scale JNC Youth & Community Worker £17,041 pa pro rata

Entry to Local Government Pension Scheme (After qualifying period) 

This post is an opportunity to work with other providers and focus on young people in Marchwood.  Planning, delivering and evaluating a wide range of youth & community work. We are interested in hearing from people who are team players with positive attitudes, who have energy, commitment and creativity to motivate young people to learn new skills and develop their abilities.

The post is for 22.5 hours per week, which are to be worked flexibly, including supporting the established village youth club and their already established evening sessions. This role includes some other evenings and weekends as and when required. All applicants need a recognised youth work qualification and must be prepared to undertake an enhanced DBS check.
Click on the links below for job description and application form

Click Here to download Job Description
Click Here to download Application Form

Animal accidents map shows worst New Forest roads

I love living in the New Forest, but one of the worst bits is every so often driving past the scene of an animal that has been hit as it wandered into the road – many of these are fatal accidents.  Recently New Forest organisations have published a new map to highlight the worst roads for animal accidents.

New-Forest-Animal-Accidents-Map-2014

The map shows 138 accidents across the Forest in 2014, with more than a third of accidents taking place on just three roads:

  • B3078 from Cadnam to Godshill – 24 accidents
  • B3054 from Hatchet Pond to Portmore – 16 accidents
  • B3056 from Hatchet Pond to Lyndhurst – 13 accidents

A number of Forest organisations work together to reduce the number of accidents including the Verderers, the Commoners Defence Association, New Forest National Park Authority, Hampshire Constabulary, the Forestry Commission, New Forest District Council and Hampshire County Council.

The overall number of accidents fell in 2014 to 138 (from 181 in 2013). But Forest organisations are warning against any complacency, especially among motorists who travel across the Forest each day as most incidents involve people who live in or close to the New Forest. This is particularly important as many foals are born at this time of year.

Initiatives include fitting reflective pony collars, changing road warning signs to keep drivers’ attention, traffic calming measures, verge cutting to increase visibility and awareness campaigns.

Sue Westwood, Clerk to the Verderers, said: ‘New Forest ponies and cattle are free to roam the New Forest and it’s their grazing activity which shapes the iconic landscape. We hope this map will be a visual reminder to motorists to be aware of animals as they’re driving. Although accidents are spread across the Forest and their distribution changes every year, there are particular roads which always seem to have a high number of accidents.’

Nigel Matthews, Head of Recreation Management and Learning at the New Forest National Park Authority, said: ‘Local motorists should never assume that it won’t happen to them. One day that animal beside the road will step out at the last minute, so go slowly and give it a wide berth. The speed limit is 30 or 40mph for a reason. Animals are on the road day and night, and unfortunately have no fear of cars.’

Driving tips:

  • Be ready to stop – ponies may step out even when they’ve seen you approaching
  • Slow down, especially at night and when other cars are approaching with their headlights on
  • Give animals grazing by the side of the road a wide berth
  • Take extra care when there are animals on the verges on both sides of the road – they may cross to join their friends.
  • Consider travelling on the fenced roads (such as the A31, A337 and A35) so that you don’t have to cross the open Forest.
  • The faster you are going, the greater the damage will be to the animal, your car and your passengers – start your journey early so you don’t have to hurry.
  • If you witness or are involved in an accident involving a pony, donkey, cow, pig or sheep, call the Police (999 for an emergency or 101 if it’s not an emergency).

Slavery in the New Forest

Little Testwood Farm - slavery

I was shocked and saddened to read this headline: “Eight men rescued from suspected slavery Little Testwood Farm in Calmore“:

POLICE have rescued eight men from a site in Totton following an investigation into potential slavery and servitude.

Officers from Hampshire Constabulary, supported by the National Crime Agency, executed a warrant around 6am today at Little Testwood Farm on Salisbury Road, Calmore.  The men are aged between 21 and 46 and are a mix of Romanian, Latvian and Polish nationalities.  Police also recovered industrial equipment that is believed to have been stolen.

A 27-year-old man from Luton was arrested on suspicion of knowingly holding another person in slavery or servitude and remains in custody.

The men have been taken to a survivor reception centre where they are receiving emotional and practical support. The centre is run by officers from Amberstone, Hampshire Constabulary’s specialist interview support team, with assistance from the Red Cross, the Salvation Army, Hampshire County Council and the NHS.

Detective Inspector Phil Scrase from Southampton CID said:

“As this morning’s action shows, we’ll take swift action against anyone suspected of exploiting vulnerable members of society for their own gain.  We know that people are being trafficked, exploited and enslaved across the country including here in Hampshire.  I’d urge anyone with concerns, suspicions or information that could help our enquiries to contact us in confidence.  For example, if you’re being offered cheap labour that’s too good to be true for the amount it costs, ask yourself: who’s really paying?”

Anyone with information about slavery, servitude, exploitation or trafficking can call the police on 101 or 999 in an emergency.  If you don’t want to speak to the police directly, you can also call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 or the national slavery helpline on 0800 0121 700

Reindeer Get Reflecting Antlers

Reflective Antlers

In Lapland, where reindeer herds are kept as livestock, yet graze freely most of the year, a new technique is being used to reduce the number of reindeer struck by cars at night. I cannot make the Finnish Sami language article translate into English, but according to redditor og_nichander, the antlers are sprayed with a reflective material that only shows up when headlights shine on it. Therefore,  you won’t see eerie herds of antlers moving in the night – unless you are about to hit them with your car.

I wonder if it is something we could do in the New Forest – maybe paint stripes onto the wild donkeys and ponies?