Use McDonald’s monopoly tokens to help the homeless

If you’re a keen visitor to McDonald’s, you’ll know about its recurring Monopoly promotion that runs in a number of countries across the globe. You’ll often get a free food voucher for a portion of fries or a McFlurry, but while you might be tempted to hoard them for future binges, perhaps donating them to the homeless is a better way of using them.

That’s what Matt Lawson from Melbourne in Australia proposed in a Facebook post on Monday:

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McDonald’s is currently running the monopoly game and I’ve got an idea. If you win free food by purchasing food you would of bought anyway, why not put your tokens in a jar and take them to an area where you know there are people less fortunate then yourself (Melbourne CBD, Fitzroy shelters etc).i did it today and if all of us do it together we can be part of a small change. FEEL FREE TO SHARE. #bethechange#monopolisecharity

“Why not put your tokens in a jar and take them to an area where you know there are people less fortunate then [sic] yourself,” he wrote. “I did it today and if all of us do it together we can be part of a small change.”

“I know it’s still consuming junk food, but it can teach our kids and ourselves a lesson in giving with no taking,” he said in a comment on the viral post.

What a simple idea to make a small difference in your community.

 

Refugees’ lifejackets have been turned into a ‘graveyard’ outside parliament

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More than 2,500 lifejackets that were actually worn by migrants who crossed from Turkey into Europe were placed in front of the U.K.’s Parliament today to raise further awareness about the global migrant and refugee crisis. The project was created by various charity and humanitarian groups to correspond with a meeting of world leaders at the U.N. to discuss the ongoing crisis.

This year alone so far, at least 3,212 refugees and migrants have died attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea.  Deaths are occurring more frequently this year than in 2015, according to the most recent figures reported by the International Organization for Migration.

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The installation — which was supported by refugee charities — intends to remind leaders of “the need for solidarity with refugees” and to encourage “international responsibility sharing”.

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Fight for Justice over the Olympics

The It’s a Penalty campaign harnesses the power of sport to protect children from exploitation and abuse around the world, and at major global sporting events.

Throughout the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, It’s a Penalty reached over 300 million people globally. There were 11,252 calls to the Brazilian national crisis line reporting child exploitation.

For the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic games, they’re striving to do the same.

It’s a Penalty Informs, Equips, Educates, Spreads Awareness and Communicates about how to make a difference in the global community to protect these children.

Together we can put an end to it.

Cybercrime Workshop for Charities

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Please find a ‘Save the Date’ request, for a free Cybercrime Workshop aimed at helping smaller charities and voluntary organisations protect themselves against cybercrime attacks. This will be held on the morning of Thursday 10th November 2016 at St John’s House in Winchester.

 

If you are interested in attending, or would like any further information, please contact either rosie.taylor@actionhants.org.uk or marketing@hantscf.org.uk.

A learning opportunity from Tearfund

Our vision of God’s Kingdom coming here on earth includes a fair and sustainable world where all people can flourish, and creation is cared for.

To get there, we need a prophetic movement of people working for transformation in the way we live our daily lives, as well as political change on poverty, the environment and inequality. We believe the church is a crucial part of this movement, and so at Tearfund we’re working to enable more Christians to be part of this change.

Does this idea excite you? Would you like to come together with others to develop and hone your change-making skills?

We’re working together with Christian Aid, the URC and CAFOD to take a group of people on a year-long learning journey. It’ll start with a weekend retreat (in Manchester) on 16-17th July where we’ll be learning about community organising from the Centre for Theology and Community. Going forward from the retreat there will be support, coaching and regular input from Tearfund and from each other.

If you are interested in this, please email us (campaigns@tearfund.org) ASAP for more details. Please do also forward this email onto others you think might be interested.

Thanks,

Billie Anderson
Tearfund Campaigns

PS We’d also love to hear your stories of how you or your church are already part of this prophetic movement for change, do email them to us!

Kid President’s 2016 campaign aims to end child hunger

The European referendum isn’t the only campaign story you should be paying attention to this year — everyone’s favourite kid “politician” is speaking out about the big issues, too.

Robby Novak, better known as YouTube sensation Kid President, teamed up with ConAgra Foods and Feeding America to launch a new campaign Thursday focusing on child hunger in the United States.

The latest Kid President video showcases the Child Hunger Ends Here initiative, furthering his belief that kids “should focus on being more awesome, and not have to worry about their next meal.”

Novak and his brother-in-law, Brad Montague, created the Kid President video series to show how anyone, even kids, can create positive social change. Over the last five years, the pair has helped provide more than 500,000 meals to communities around the world.

Their partnership with ConAgra Foods, one of North America’s biggest packaged food companies, has specifically targeted child hunger in the U.S.

For every view and share of the video above between April 14 and May 9, ConAgra will donate the monetary equivalent of a meal to hunger relief organization Feeding America.

Montague said:

“I’m embarrassed to admit it, but I had no clue there were so many families struggling with food insecurity here in the United States”.

He learned about the issue from young people during his own service learning program in 2009 — young girls showed him not only that there was a problem going on here, he says, but that there are also solutions.

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With the growth of the Kid President audience, Montague and Novak have been able to create a community that makes good things happen.

Montague describes their partnership with ConAgra Foods as more heartfelt and genuine than many brands and organizations he’s encountered.

Robert Rizzo, senior director of community investment at ConAgra:

“Committing to an issue as serious as child hunger is a constant challenge.  It’s promising to see results on an individual level when we hear from families whose lives have been changed as a result of ConAgra’s commitment.”

More people than ever use food banks in Britain today – and I’m one of them

As the Trussell Trust reveals that food bank usage is at record levels one user writes a first hand account of her experiences using one:

My designated food bank operates out of a nearby church and I feel a deep sense of shame and anxiety on the way there. I worry that someone I know locally will stop to chat and I will be exposed as broke and dependent on charity.

The food bank volunteers, however, are kind and solicitous. They introduce themselves, shake my hand, and invite me to sit in chairs thoughtfully grouped at conversational angles. I am not interrogated and nobody towers over me; I am grateful for the eye contact and empathy I receive in response to my tale of benefit delays, impoverishment and worries about the rent. I am offered tea, cake and cheerful conversation in the most welcoming tradition of the church. It feels as though the whole process has been carefully worked out in order to preserve my dignity and I am moved by this tenderness.

 

As I unpack my groceries, I am deeply grateful that there are good citizens out there who have a bit to spare. I am also deeply angry that it is up to the churches and charities to plug the gaps left by a welfare state that seems to be creaking under sustained ideological pressure in one of the world’s richest countries. I feel guilty that my poverty is nothing compared to the suffering of those in developing nations or walking the roads of hostile Europe seeking refuge from war. And I am thankful that I have enough to eat for a while longer and that I will live to fight another day.

 

Save our Children’s Centres & Early Help Hubs

I have been involved in the campaign against cuts to our children’s centres and early help hubs in Hampshire, partly through my role as the Chair of the New Forest East Children’s Centre Partnership Board, and as a member of the New Forest Early Help Hub as a local children’s and youth worker.

How can you join the campaign?

Most importantly please add your views to the Consultation that Hampshire County Council are running.  If you’re not sure how best to respond, read the New Forest East Cluster Children’s Centre Partnership Board’s advice for completing the Consultation Questionnaire.

Please also sign the petition to save the Hampshire Children’s Centres.

The Challenge

New Forest Children's CentreHampshire County Council is asking for the views of service users, other stakeholders and members of the public, on a proposed new Family Support Service for families with children aged 0–19 years (or up to age 25 for young adults with learning difficulties and/or disabilities).

The theory of a 0-19 united service is a positive move, and one that has been developing over the last few years through the way professionals have been working closer together.

Worryingly though the proposal includes the closing of 43 Children’s Centres, and reducing the current staffing levels (currently 300 employees) for the Children’s Centres and the Early Help Hub by 60%.

The context is clearly driven by economic challenges: the County Council must meet a funding shortfall of £98 million by April 2017, and of this, the Council have decided that £21.5 million must be met from the Children’s Services budget.  These proposals for changes to Children’s Centres and Early Help Hubs total £8.5 million of savings.


What are Children’s Centres & Early Help Hubs?

Introduced 17 years ago by the Labour government as Children's Centre 1Sure Start, children’s centres are designed to help parents in the community, providing a central hub for activities for under 5s, early education, health and family support. They have faced heavy cuts as a result of dwindling council budgets and hundreds have closed over the past five years, either by shutting down entirely or through mergers.

The Early Help Hub is a more recent innovation that came as a result of The Munro Review of Child Protection which argued a moral argument, a timing argument (now or never) to put right the problems in early years support; and an economic argument that early help hub was cost effective.

Archbishop of York criticises the new Living Wage

An article written by the Archbishop of York on the introduction of the new Living Wage challenging the new Living Wage that George Osborne has created, arguing that it is essentially an increase on the national minimum wage for over-25s and rebranded it the national living wage:

Last year, just after a certain supermarket announced their plans to pay a Living Wage, I overheard an interesting conversation in a different supermarket. The woman operating my till asked her colleague whether she would consider applying for a job with the Living Wage supermarket. She said no; she did not believe it was a real Living Wage,  they had simply found ways to dock wages elsewhere – such as no longer paying staff extra for working on a Sunday.

Like that checkout assistant, many of us remain unconvinced by Chancellor George Osborne packaging up what is essentially an increase on the National Minimum Wage for over 25s and rebranding it the “National Living Wage”. Of course it is to be welcomed that Mr Osborne is increasing wages at the bottom level for over 25s. But let’s call it what it is: a new legal minimum wage for over 25s. It is not a living wage in any real sense; it is not paying workers what they deserve and it is not paying workers what they need in order to achieve a decent standard of living in the UK.

Supermarkets donate food to charities

Supermarkets in France have been banned from throwing away or spoiling unsold food by law.  The stores are now required to donate unwanted food to charities and food banks.

To stop foragers, some supermarkets have poured bleach over the discarded food or storing binned food in locked warehouses.

Donation-box-webCourbevoie councillor Arash Derambarsh had started a petition to the French senate that the supermarkets should support their local food banks.  This law was voted unanimously by the French senate and will apply to any supermarket with a footprint of 400 square metres or larger.

I wish that this campaign would spread further afield.  If you’re in the UK, check out the brand new scheme FareShare FoodCloud to be piloted in Tesco stores to send unsold food that can be used to charities rather than be wasted.  We’ve been part of the pilot in the New Forest and it’s been great to be able to use some of the food that previously would have been thrown away with children and young people in our local community.

 

 

Smart map for homeless people in Berlin

I love the concept of this map – it’s beautiful and yet also incredibly helpful.

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Adapting the London Underground map, the Berliner Stadtmission, raises the issue of homeless people in the winter.

The map highlights places for help and shelter in the German capital – places where clothing and food can be collected, and where homeless people can find shelter in cold winter days.

The map is map by creative collective Hektik, also from Berlin. See their website for more work for the Stadtmission and examples how the underground map is used. The campaign is titled with the hashtag #WasHeißtFrieren which supposedly means something like ‘what is actually freezing?

‘Credit unions provide a much-needed alternative for many consumers’

Making money and good investments concept

Check out this brilliant post on how ‘Credit unions provide a much-needed alternative for many consumers’:

The UK has a money problem. And no, I don’t mean our national debt. This one is personal. Money being borrowed by consumers recently saw its highest jump in eight years, whilst one in three of us couldn’t afford a £200 expense in an emergency without borrowing. A whopping nine million Britons are in debt.

The Christmas season just gone caused a typical upsurge in consumer spending; the average British family was set to spend £800 on their celebrations.The arrival of the New Year, however, has heralded an altogether different story. For many, the aftermath of the festive season brings into clear focus their own financial struggles.

The Church Credit Champions Network is trying to do something about this. Set up in response to the Archbishop of Canterbury’s famous ‘Wonga’ comments made in July 2013, the network is working with credit unions, debt advice providers and other initiatives to build a more financially resilient society, all through the local church.

Credit unions provide a much needed financial alternative for many consumers, particularly around Christmas time. Most credit unions offer Christmas savings accounts, where members are incentivised to save money throughout the year for the annual big spend, and can only draw it out in November and December.

Credit unions also provide flexible, low-cost credit. This is a much-needed and fairer alternative to many other organisations out there, such as the payday loan companies which offer only expensive loans with interest rates, and the banks who exclude so many on lower incomes from accessing their products. One Kensington-based credit union saw a 25% increase in loans this Christmas as people ditched payday lenders.

Churches can support credit unions in various ways, such as promoting membership to congregations and communities, or by opening up buildings as points of access for credit union services. The Church Credit Champions Network has built relationships with local credit unions and is connecting them with churches in order to scale up this vital sector.

Debt advice and money management help is also widely needed to build a more financially resilient society. Christians Against Poverty run a fantastic debt counselling model for churches and helped around 2,500 people go debt free in 2014. They have also produced a savings-focused budgeting course. Community Money Advice offer a debt advice centre model for churches too. The Church Credit Champions Network is encouraging churches to consider offering these services wherever they can.

By March this year, the network is on target to have generated £2.2 million in social benefit, measured by the estimated increase in access to affordable credit and increased volunteering due to its activities. Two hundred churches across the network’s current active areas of London and Liverpool have engaged in some way, and almost 3,000 people have joined credit unions as a result. These figures are set to dramatically increase as the network rolls out nationally in 2016 and the church continues to support credit unions, and offer debt advice and money management help.

Through its resources, relationships and connections, the Church Credit Champions Network is beginning to help build a fairer financial society but perhaps more importantly, it is also providing the Church with a vehicle through which to act on its mission.

– Tom Newbold, London coordinator for the Church Credit Champions Network