Working Bugatti Chiron made of 1 million Lego pieces

Following on from the Full-size LEGO Car Lego have unveiled a functioning sports car that looks as close to the original supercar from Bugatti as is possible when using more than 1 million Lego Technic parts, more than 2,300 Lego motors, and 4,000 gear wheels in the engine. It’s just about as one-to-one as you can get with building blocks.

According to Lego, the 3,300-pound car can actually take you from point A to B; a former racing driver took it for a test drive and pushed it to 12.4 mph which is amazing for a Lego model.  To put it in perspective, a legit Chiron can reach 60 mph in only 2.5 seconds and has a max speed of 260 mph.

The test drive with Andy Wallace took place at the Ehra-Lessien facility in Germany, where the real Chiron was first tested.

The Lego Bugatti took more than 13,000 work-hours to develop and build, and thanks to Lego’s tireless efforts, a driver and passenger can comfortably sit inside the vehicle. There’s even a working brake pedal and speedometer that shows how fast it’s going. The car’s powered by two batteries, an 80-volt for the motor and a 12-volt for the steering and electronics inside the car, so there’s no revving the engine or shifting gears here — but, hey, the lights work.

The life-sized car was built only a few months after Lego showed off its Bugatti Chiron building set earlier this summer. But that tiny replica didn’t generate the 5.3 horsepower of its life-sized big brother — impressive, as long as you don’t compare it to the real Bugatti’s 1,500 horsepower.

The human catapult

I’m not a fan of rollercoasters, let alone bungee jumps, but for those of you who want something more extreme, try this human catapult.

The Nevis Catapult hurls willing participants 150 metres (164 yards) across the Nevis Valley near Queenstown, New Zealand.  If you’re up for it, you can experience up to 3g of force, and fly at speeds of almost 100 kilometres per hour (62 miles per hour) in 1.5 seconds. While these are impressive numbers, the video of the whole thing speaks for itself.

Henry van Asch, co-founder of AJ Hackett Bungy New Zealand, revealed the Nevis Catapult after “years of playing around with the idea.”  He added “it’s a pretty unique feeling, surprising even. There’s nothing else quite like it”.

The Nevis Catapult was a specially built design, then tested out-of-sight in Christchurch over the last nine months. Testing began with weighted barrels, before moving on to a test dummy phase, and then finally, brave humans.

Like many of these things it’s not cheap, costing NZ$255 (US$176), and you’ll need to be at least 13 years old to participate, plus weigh between 45 to 127 kilograms (99 to 279 lbs).

What Will Happen In Your Body In The Next 60 Seconds

Even when we sit around doing nothing at all, our bodies are busy.  Sustaining life is an miraculous feat, and every organ of your body must work together around the clock to keep it going.  For your entire lifetime.  When you know all the stuff going on, you’ll have a real sense of accomplishment – or else you’ll be exhausted.

Bowling Tricks and Pool Shots

Poolbowl must be some kind of combination of pool and 10 pin bowling.  This video shows us that Jason Belmonte and Florian “Venom” Kohler have a lot of time on their hands, and have used it to perfect some glorious tricks. So what if they have terabytes of outtakes, this compilation video is awesome!

The #DeleAlliChallenge

The next internet craze is upon us: People are trying, and mostly failing, to copy a pose Tottenham Hotspur player Dele Alli did after he scored a goal against Newcastle this week. Whether it was planned or not, this was the first sighting of this now iconic hand gesture.

What Alli does with his hands looks simple enough — but it turns out making an “ok” sign with your thumb and forefinger, turning it upside-down, and then letting it rest around your eye is actually harder than it seems.  Good luck trying to replicate it.

The Two-Minute Surf Wave

Pro surfer Koa Smith caught a wave off Namibia’s Skeleton Bay that took him for a nearly a mile! He surfed a single wave for a distance of 1.5 kilometers for two minutes that took him through eight barrels. It was captured on video, both from a drone and from Smith’s own GoPro POV. Both videos are mesmerizing.

My whole day surfing I try to InVision that one dream wave that I want to experience. I picture it clearly. What it will look like. How it will feel. The emotions pouring out of me when the wave is complete. Then this happen 🙂

Kangaroo delays football game

A kangaroo delayed the second half of a match between soccer teams Blue Devils FC and Canberra FC on Sunday, when it hopped onto the field and set itself in front of goal.

After a little while, the kangaroo hopped off the field and toward the carpark. Then it returned, again, to interrupt the second half of play.

How the food we feed young people affects their brain

How the food we feed young people affects their brain

At work we’ve been reflecting recently on how our young people’s diet affects their brain.

When it comes to what you bite, chew and swallow, your choices have a direct and long-lasting effect on the most powerful organ in your body: your brain. So which foods cause you to feel so tired after lunch? Or so restless at night? Mia Nacamulli has this amazing video which takes you into the brain to find out.

The challenge now is how does this alter the youth work we run – does it change how what food we provide and what treats we offer?  What are you doing in your setting?

View the full lesson here.

O Come Let Us Adore Him

Merry Christmas!

And as the carol says:

O Come All Ye Faithful
Joyful and triumphant,
O come ye, O come ye to Bethlehem.
Come and behold Him,
Born the King of Angels;
O come, let us adore Him,
O come, let us adore Him,
O come, let us adore Him,
Christ the Lord.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=19&v=Mj7Pr42rliI

Christmas video 25: Christmas according to kids

What happens when you ask a bunch of kids to tell the story of Christmas? Enjoy this story of Bethle-ha-ha-ham and the magical star that appeared.

The natural humour of the children of Southland Christian Church describing the nativity story makes this an obvious video to show at your Christmas family service:

 

Christmas video 24: Christmas Starts with a Baby’s Giggle

The constant onslaught of Christmas advertising from October onwards can start to wear a little thin as we enter December. Something inside us knows that however lovely the advert featuring a snowman giving a gift to a unicorn is – or whatever this years iteration is – it’s not really what Christmas is all about.

Instead, here is a concise and creative away of sharing the crux of the Christmas message: two parents, one baby and a whole lot of love.