Help find a Strictly Come Dancing Star for Comic Relief

Strictly Come Dancing

Strictly Come Dancing professionals are set to put a sparkle into the lives of members of the public by training them to strut their stuff for a new BBC series.

For the first time EVER the BBC team that brings you ‘Strictly Come Dancing’ is opening its dance floor to the public and they’re looking for inspiring everyday unsung heroes to go on this incredible journey. We would really like you to nominate your heroes or heroines for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity – their very own televised Strictly experience for Comic Relief as part of the next Red Nose Day campaign!

We are looking for you to nominate inspirational people who genuinely change many other people’s lives – and of course, it is essential that they are Strictly super fans. The show is going to be a complete surprise to these individuals, so it is very important that they have no idea they are being nominated for the show. It should be an amazing chance to reward these amazing people, with an unforgettable experience that will be broadcast to the nation at a primetime slot on BBC One.

To nominate your hero, all you have to do is send an email to nominate@bbc.co.uk to receive an application form.

Deadline for applications is 31st October 2014. Good luck!!

Funny headlines from around the world

Some of the more random headlines from the BBC News website over the last week or so:

Funny headlines from around the world

Some of the more random headlines from the BBC News website over the last week or so:

English Football Player Gives Broke Fan Free Tickets via Twitter

Mings

At a time when football has focussed on Paolo Di Canio’s political views, perhaps we should have been paying a bit more attention to Tyrone Mings

Mings is a defender for Ipswich Town FC, and he did one local fan a big solid before Saturday’s match against Bolton Wanderers.  The story, which was reported on Digital Football, starts with a fan called Tris Monk, who tweeted a good luck message Mings’ way but said he was too “skint” to make the match in person

@tyronemings1 good luck today, wish i was there to watch, hopfully 3 points #skint

— tris monk (@blutris89) March 16, 2013

Generously, the player tweeted back and asked the fan if he could make it to Portman Road (Ipswich Town FC stadium). When the fan responded that he could get there, the defender tweeted:

Mings twitter

 

The astonishing act of loyalty and generosity to a fan was a very simple act of kindness, but has quickly catapulted Mings to Twitter stardom with his initial tweet being retweeted 5,244 times. On top of this the youngster has seen his profile rise in the media with stories from the BBC, The Sun, Metro and ITV!

Funny stories from around the world

Some more funny and random headlines from around the world:

Facebook Being Sued Over Like Button

Facebook Being Sued Over Like Button

The BBC has reported that Facebook is being sued for its use of the “like” button and other features of the social network.  It is being sued by a patent-holding company, Rembrandt Social Media, acting on behalf of a dead Dutch programmer called Joannes Jozef Everardus van Der Meer.

Rembrandt Social Media said Facebook’s success was based, in part, on using two of Mr Van Der Meer’s patents without permission.  Facebook said it had no comment to make on the lawsuit or its claims.

“We believe Rembrandt’s patents represent an important foundation of social media as we know it, and we expect a judge and jury to reach the same conclusion based on the evidence,” said lawyer Tom Melsheimer from legal firm Fish and Richardson, which represents the patent holder.

Rembrandt now owns patents for technologies Mr Van Der Meer used to build a fledgling social network, called Surfbook, before his death in 2004.  Mr Van Der Meer was granted the patents in 1998, five years before Facebook first appeared.  Surfbook was a social diary that let people share information with friends and family and approve some data using a “like” button, according to legal papers filed by Fish and Richardson.  The papers also say Facebook is aware of the patents as it has cited them in its own applications to patent some social networking technologies.

Do you think the Like button is something that can and should be patented? Tell us your thoughts on the suit in the comments.

UK’s first Atheist Church opens

Atheist Church

Stand-up comedians Sanderson Jones and Pippa Evans will bring together a godless congregation in The Nave in St Paul’s Road, Canonbury for services – with wedding ceremonies and funerals for non-believers even on the cards.

News of the church, which will meet on the first Sunday of every month starting with a service on the Feast of Epiphany on January 6, comes after the census results revealed last week that nearly one in three residents are atheists.

Mr Jones and Ms Evans, a musical improv comedian who had a BBC Radio 4 show called Showstopper, came up with the idea for The Sunday Assembly after agreeing they liked many aspects of religion but didn’t believe in a god.

Sanderson Jones, recently became the first person to sell out the Sydney Opera House by personally selling all tickets by hand, told The Islington Gazette:

“We thought it would be a shame not to enjoy the good stuff about religion, like the sense of community, just because of a theological disagreement.  It’s part atheist church and part foot-stomping show. There will be a speaker on a theme each month but there will also be an awesome house band, which Pippa will lead. We’ll be helping people try and stick to their new year’s resolutions in the first service.”

The comics will invite speakers to talk on a theme every month, starting with children’s author Andy Stanton, who writes the Mr Gum series, on the topic of beginnings. Future guest speakers include fellow comedians Josie Long, Lucy Porter and Arthur Smith.

Mr Jones added:

“We all should be ludicrously excited every single moment to be alive in one of the best countries in the world. If the church becomes a useful place for others, that would be a good thing. We just want people to feel encouraged and excited when they leave.”

But the Rev Saviour Grech, Catholic parish priest of Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church in Amwell Street, Finsbury, said:

“How can you be an atheist and worship in a church? Surely it’s a contradiction of terms. Who will they be singing to?  It is important to debate and engage with atheists but for them to establish a church like any other religious denomination is going too far. I’m cautious about it.”

It does leave me slightly confused as to why you would imitate a Christian service, but try and do it in the theological perspective of atheism, and deeply ironic to do it in an ex church.  What does anyone else think?