The Degeneration of Facebook in 10 Statuses

Facebook's logo

Facebook started off as a true social media that focussed on keeping up-to-date with what friends are up to.  Over the last few years it’s changed dramatically, in ways summed up beautifully by The Degeneration of Facebook in 10 Statuses:

Gone are the kittens and puppies, they’ve been replaced by vomit inducing images of dogs being punched, roadkill, videos of children being punched on public transport, girls sucking on used tampons, kids stabbing their hands with knives, injuries, insults, masturbation and sexually suggestive selfies. It’s a place for generating hatred, inciting witch-hunts and scare mongering. What happened Facebook? We used to be friends.

Over the years users have also developed a distinct lack of personality. Statuses generally follow a pattern made up of ‘trendy’ words and before you know it, everyone’s coming out with the same old stuff. It’s all one big competition, it’s theHunger Games of photographs and hyperbole and the modern day equivalent of gossiping over the garden fence and keeping up with the Joneses or Kardashiwotnots. Here are a few of the statuses responsible for the degeneration Facebook.

“Click ‘Like’ if…”

…You’ve lost someone to cancer, you want to find a cure for cancer, you love your daughter, you love your kids, you enjoy breathing, you like clicking like etc. Stop clicking like and fill a bag with old clothes and take it to a charity shop, give money to cancer research, tell your kids you love them to their face. Save the tip of your index finger and do something that will actually make a real difference.

“Anyone know the number for the Doctor’s Surgery?”
“Anyone know the number for 999?”

If you can update your status, you can search for a telephone number. The above are desperate, attention seeking posts and require nothing more than the obligatory “Why what’s up hun?” or “Hope everything’s okay hunnii” or “I’m here if you need me hon” or… oh I can’t be bothered but I know you know what I mean.

“I would like to take this opportunity to wish Rihanna a happy 3rd birthday. Congratulations sweetie we are so proud of you. Love from Mum, Dad, Kev, Nana, Grandpa and Carol next door x”

Can baby Rihanna read? Does she have a Facebook account? “I’d like to take this opportunity”? Have you really been so busy that this is the only chance you’ve had to wish your daughter a happy birthday is through a Facebook account she can’t read and has no access to?

See also: “Shakira, we have just been to your school open evening and your teacher said that you are the best in the whole school at absolutely everything. We are so proud of you. Love from Mum, Dad, Kev, Nana, Grandpa and Carol next door x”

Oh, stop showing off!

“Well Nana, it’s been 7 years today since you died…”

Nana didn’t use Facebook when she was alive so the chance of her being able to read this when she’s been dead for seven years are pretty slim.

“#Bored.com”

For starters, why do people use hashtag on Facebook? It’s completely superfluous and then there is nothing more boring than someone who is bored and nothing more criminal than sticking a .com after a word to describe your feelings.

“Rate me”

This is the dangerous one. Mainly because it encourages users to post pictures of themselves in their new clothes or hardly any clothes and then asks friends to rate the pictures and their figures. The problem here is users are appealing to their “friends” if you look awful they’re not going to tell you because they’re your friend and they don’t want to upset you. So no matter how hideous you look, people will click “LIKE” and they will comment with things like “Beautiful Hunniiiiii”.

Blatant vanity and a desperate appeal for compliments seems to carry absolutely no shame whatsoever and adding “I hate this picture” to the posted image won’t fool anyone. If you genuinely hated it, you would press delete. Well done Facebook, you’ve created a monster, and a bloody ugly one to boot!

Check out the article for the other four statuses that have made Facebook a worse place to be

Funny stories from around the world

Some more funny and random headlines from around the world:

 

Open Paris Session 3: Digital Media and Mission

Open Paris header-v3

Session 3 of the Open Paris Conference was From Guttenberg to Zuckerberg: How Social Media is Changing the Church by me.  If you wish to use the powerpoint click here:

 

Of all the messages the world has ever heard from politicians, story tellers, advertisers and more the gospel is still the stickiest.  The good news is that God’s message is your message, which makes your presence and voice online wholly (and holy) indispensable!

I want to challenge you today as a Christ follower to change your mind-set of the way you spend your time online.  I want to challenge you to forgo denomination, to sit in the same pew or row, and write this ongoing story together and share new ways to reach a fragmented world for Christ.

Together, as leaders we can light up the online space.  We can “go” and we can “tell” as Jesus asked each of us to do.  And we can change absolutely everything.

Game Changers

Throughout history, game changers have stepped forward in the faith to affect the way people communicate God’s truth in the culture in which they live.

As far back as 2002, Pope John Paul II got it.  He understood the significance of the Internet and inspired Christians around the globe to embrace it as a way to share Christ with the world.  Here’s what he said in a public speech:

“From this galaxy of sight and sound will the face of Christ emerge and the voice of Christ be heard?  For it is only when His face is seen and His voice heard that the world will know the glad tidings of our redemption.  This is the purpose of evangelisation.  And this is what will make the Internet a genuinely human space, for if there is no room for Christ, there is no room for man … I dare to summon the whole Church bravely to cross this new threshold, to put out into the deep of the Net, so that now as in the past, the great engagement of the Gospel and culture may show to the world, ‘the glory of God on the face of Christ.”

Communication channels have changed radically since Moses walked down the mountain, stone tablets in hand.  Old Testament scribes wrote on parchment made from treated skins of sheep or goats, and they used pens fashioned from reeds.  The prophets preached in synagogues and countryside’s.  Later, Paul wrote his letters on scrolls of papyrus and gave them to friends who would deliver them to the churches in other cities.

Little did Paul realise the frenzy that would kick up on the other side of his prison bars as game changers emerged, ready to take up the charge of the gospel.  Generations of followers communicated the gospel with various tools.  In 1440 the printing press changed everything as Bibles went from locked archives to retail.

In 1517 Martin Luther nailed the Ninety-Five Theses on the door of the University Church in Wittenberg and changed the game again.  Religious tracts were used as major channels throughout the turbulence of the Protestant Reformation.  John Calvin wrote, debated, and preached tirelessly during the Reformation.  In the eighteenth century, John Wesley travelled 250,000 miles by horseback in his efforts to spread the Word, and he preached in open fields to as many as twenty thousand people at a time.

In 1922 Aimee Semple McPherson preached what is believed to be the first radio sermon.  Christian writers such as A.W. Tozer and C.S. Lewis followed with critically important writings through World War II.  Passionate game changers such as Dwight Moody and Billy Graham also shared the gospel over the radio waves.  Television and revivals catapulted the reach of Billy Graham’s ministry.  His first television crusade generated 1.5 million letters to the television station, confirming the power of that medium.

Bill Bright was another game changer when he wrote The Four Spiritual Laws, the most widely distributed religious booklet in history, and later commissioned The JESUS Film, one of the most influential films ever made.  The renowned documentary on the life of Christ has reached more than 6 billion people in 234 countries and has been translated into one thousand languages.

But just because a technology evolves, there is no guarantee that a demand will support it.  Remember the Microsoft Zune?  The Apple Cube?  Google Buzz?  You don’t remember the technology failures because they failed.  Multiple factors can be attributed to why social media has grown so rapidly, including cheaper broadband, a fire to innovate and the global economy shift.  As unprecedented economic, political, and social factors continue to fragment continents, cities and even homes, words such as connection, community, and relationship increasingly dominate the conversation.

To explain this in statistics it took radio thirty-eight years to reach fifty million users; television, thirteen years; the Internet, four years; and the iPod, three years.  In just a nine month period, Facebook added one hundred million users, and downloads of iPhone applications reached one billion.

Still think using social media is a passing fad or another waste of time?  You may soon join the ranks of these leading, albeit well-meaning, thinkers:

  • “Everyone acquainted with the subject will recognise it as a conspicuous failure.”  Henry Morton, president of the Stevens Institute of Technology on Thomas Edison’s light bulb, 1880.
  • “The horse is here to stay but the automobile is only a novelty – a fad”  The president of the Michigan Savings Bank advising Henry Ford’s lawyer not to invest in the Ford Motor Company, 1903.
  • “Remote shopping, while entirely feasible, will flop – because women like to get out of the house, like to handle merchandise, like to be able to change their minds.”  Time, 1966
  • “While theoretically and technically television may be feasible, commercially and financially it is an impossibility, a development of which we need waste little time dreaming.”  Lee DeForest, American radio pioneer, and inventor of the vacuum tube, 1926.
  • “Transmission of documents via telephone wires is possible in principle, but the apparatus required is so expensive that it will never become a practical proposition.”  Dennis Gabor, British physicist, 1969.

Broadcast to Social Media

In the five hundred years or so between the inventions of the printing press and the Internet, we have lived in a broadcast media environment of books, radio, newspapers, and television.  These media served as highly effective platforms for sending a single, well-crafted, attention-getting message out to as many people as possible.  But broadcast media afforded little opportunity for feedback or discussion, except, perhaps, for letters to the editor.  In the church, we have used this one-to-many broadcast communication model in sermons, printed newsletters, letters from the Rector, and broadcasting worship services on Radio 3 or Songs of Praise.

Social media represents a profound shift in this model.  Today, almost anyone can publish a blog, have a YouTube channel, and host their own podcast – in effect an internet based radio station.  Anyone can comment on, extend, qualify, discuss, and share a clergy’s sermons.

In the era of broadcast media, the most influential ministry platforms tended to be those of large cong

Digital Children: From Guttenberg to Zuckerberg: How Social Media is Changing the Church

Here’s my Digital Media PowerPoint and the text from my presentation at the  the Digital Children conference:

Of all the messages the world has ever heard from politicians, story tellers, advertisers and more the gospel is still the stickiest.  The good news is that God’s message is your message, which makes your presence and voice online and that of the children and young people we work with wholly (and holy) indispensable!

I want to challenge you today as a Christ follower to change your mind-set of the way you spend your time online.  I want to challenge you to share new ways to reach a fragmented world for Christ.  Together, we can light up the online space.  We can “go” and we can “tell” as Jesus asked each of us to do.

Game Changers

Multiple factors can be attributed to why social media has grown so rapidly, including cheaper broadband, a fire to innovate and the global economy shift.  As unprecedented economic, political, and social factors continue to fragment continents, cities and even homes, words such as connection, community, and relationship increasingly dominate the conversation.

Broadcast to Social Media

In the 500 years or so between the inventions of the printing press and the Internet, which Dave will explore later, we have lived in a broadcast media environment of books, radio, newspapers, and television.  These media served as highly effective platforms for sending a single, well-crafted, attention-getting message out to as many people as possible.  But broadcast media afforded little opportunity for feedback or discussion.  In the church, we have used this one-to-many broadcast communication model in sermons, printed newsletters, letters from the Rector, and broadcasting worship services on Radio 3 or Songs of Praise.

Social media represents a profound shift in this model.  Today, almost anyone can publish a blog, have a YouTube channel, and host their own podcast.  Anyone can comment on, extend, qualify, discuss, and share a sermon.  With today’s technology, you can reach in minutes, and even seconds, the physical ground that the apostle Paul and other game changers covered in years. 

Sheer size of Social Media

The sheer size of social media is huge:

  • Facebook with 1 billion (and growing) registered users, making it the third biggest country in the world.  Interestingly though for us the largest growing segment of Facebook users are those aged 55 years plus.
  • The average user has 130 friends, spending 24 minutes per day on Facebook, creating 70 pieces of content each month,
  • Each day 460,000 new users sign up to Twitter
  • 110 million tweets are posted each day
  • 37% of active Twitter users use their phone to tweet.
  • There are over 150 million blogs globally.
  • People are engaging video at increasingly higher rates (about 5%) than other social media.
  • Engagement, with video increases with each subsequent generation – for Millennials (18-33 year olds) watching video is the fourth most popular online activity behind email, web search, and social networking.
  • YouTube sees 72 hours of video uploaded every minute.
  • YouTube is also the web’s second largest search engine – people want to see us in action, hear our voice, not just read our words.
  • The average person will watch 5 hours of video a day.
  • Whilst at the Third Lausanne Congress in 2010 we were told that 25% of people coming to faith do so through media on mobile phones.

Following all those statistics it is easy to be over whelmed.  But as Paul challenges us in 2 Corinthians we need to not lose heart, not be crushed, not in despair, not abandoned, not destroyed, as we’ll hear in a moment, if anything the opportunities that we have to share the Gospel are ever increasing in this digital world.

Practicing Digital Ministry

Jesus: The Master of Buzz

Remember the viral buzz generated around The Blair Witch Project back in 1999?  How about the Susan Boyle Britain’s Got Talent audition video?  Don’t forget the explosion of the YouTube phenomenon that is now Justin Bieber, or the hilarious viral e-mail sent each Christmas that allows the whole world to Elf Itself.

We each have the opportunity to give voice to the supernatural acts of God in this day and age.  Everyday believers just like you are already stepping out and adding to Jesus’ phenomenal buzz.

However you want to look at it, as a resident of the twenty-first century you’ve got the potential to wield some serious digital influence – for Christ.  The message is as sticky, as good as it gets.  Sticky content is independent of time, change, and cyberspace.  The Apostle Paul, no doubt a thought leader of his day, knew the message was unlike anything else the world had ever known, and he wrote: “We carry this precious Message around in the unadorned clay pots of our ordinary lives.”

Adapting to technology does not mean you change the message to fit the culture.  The Word of God stands and does not need to be spiced up or watered down to fit the taste buds of any culture or generations.  The Word is as alive and active as it was when God spoke it into existence.  The only thing that you must change is your mind-set about how you must now relate to the culture around you.

Writer and theologian Francis Schaeffer said that “each generation of the church in each setting has the responsibility of communicating the gospel in understandable terms, considering the language and thought-forms of that setting.”  Whilst the technology that we’re being invited to use might be different, in essence I want to encourage you to rely on traditional modes of engaging with people that have served the Christian community well for generations.

Called to Humility

The online world provides the perfect storm for pride to rise up like a toxic tsunami.  To quote C.S. Lewis, “Humility is not thinking less of yourself but thinking of yourself less.”  When you think more of yourself, you create a place where pride creeps in, and if you’re not careful, it finds a place to set up permanent residence deep inside you.  As I’ve said earlier, we’re not here to focus on ourselves, but instead to be Jesus’ servant, faithfully sharing his message.

Humility has a gentle tone; it doesn’t condescend or diminish another person’s value.  It doesn’t ignore, marginalise, or favour.  It never criticises or corrects in public, especially over minor things.  Just check out the example of Mo Farah, having won the New Orleans half-marathon, Farah was asked by WSDU presenter LaTonya Norton if he had ever run before.  Farah broke into a smile and replied that he had run a half-marathon before, but that this was his first time running in New Orleans.  Not once during the interview did Norton note Farah’s 5,000 metres and 10,000m gold medal success at the London Olympics, only ever referring to him as the male winner of that half-marathon.  Various people in the twitter world criticised the presenter to which Mo Farah replied: “Just wanna say to everyone being nasty to LaTonya Norton please stop!! She made a mistake like we all do!! She didn’t mean anything by it!”

Caring for God’s People

When Jesus started His ministry, He began to call individuals to “follow” Him.  We see and hear the expression “follow me” or “I’m following …” a lot in the social networking realm, but to date, no one has yet to offer the return on investment (eternity) that Jesus offered.  Once the disciples began following Him, Jesus proved worthy of their trust by being consistently genuine and authentic.  Basically, He cared, and it showed as He walked, talked, prayed, ate, and lived out the highs and lows of daily life with His beloved tribe of twelve.

The same trust, built through consistent, real, one-on-one dialogue, is the goal in our online relationships.  It will be a steadiness of character, a showing up, and a reaching out with a Jesus brand of compassion that will touch hearts for eternity.

It is a paradox of social media that people will share very intimate and sometimes life-and-death matters in social media spaces, even though such sharing becomes immediately both public and permanent.  Today, new loves, breakups, engagements, marriages, divorces, birth and death announcements, health news, and personal locations are all shared online.  Social media therefore can serve as a good “leading indicator” that something is amiss with someone.

I see my Facebook news feed and Twitter stream as place of and occasions for prayer.  People, regardless of faith, in my experience, deeply appreciate these digital expressions of pastoral attentiveness and concern.

We can also actively solicit prayer requests, something we’ve often done with our youth group, in preparation for Parish Prayers on a Wednesday morning – they see that God answers all knee mails!  Interestingly I receive as many prayer request from those who don’t see themselves as Christians as from those who do.

Forming Disciples

Social media is changing the way we learn because it has changed the way we access information and the way we connect with one another.  Scott McLeod, a professor of educational leadership describes it this way: “We no longer live in an information push-out world where we passively receive information that is broadcast out to us by large, centralized entities.  Instead, we now live within multi-directional conversation spaces.”

The ability people have to find out almost anything on Google, Wikipedia or YouTube necessarily changes the role of the ministry leader as an education.  Those in leadership no longer function as “resident theologians” by virtue of any special gnosis or knowledge received in seminary, or from the shelves of the theological books and commentaries in their office.  Instead, in a sea of information, they need to help others to become theologians themselves, inviting people to reflect critically upon all the information they encounter and to engage in discussion with others over that information.

Consider the difference between a sermon and the increasingly popular Pub Theology offered by churches around the country.  In a traditional sermon, a congregation gathers to hear a vicar impart information.  There may be some discussion afterwards in coffee, but the structure of the learning is centred on the teacher who shares their expertise.

By contrast, pub theology is normally facilitated by a “resident theologian” around a table, with everyone having the opportunity to bring something meaningful to the discussion.  Social media presents a similar opportunity – a theological conversation happening in a public place, influenced by the life that is all around it.  This is, of course, entirely consistent with the Latin root of “sermon”, sermo, which means “discussion.”

Building Community

Many people worry that digital relationships will eclipse face-to-face engagement; however, studies show that people active in social networks are more likely to be engaged in face-to-face volunteerism and faith communities.  This is because people who long for community seek it out in many forms, and people who connect in meaningful ways enjoy opportunities to extend that connection in both online and offline settings.  Thus, one of the important roles we have on social network sites is to cultivate a sense of community that moves between both online and offline locales.

Making Public Witness

As we end I want to share with you examples of creative ways to share faith using evangelism.  First off, in Facebook, someone took the time to create Jesus’ account for Holy Week – I’ve used it a number of times in schools and youth work to help young people engage with the Gospel.

Second, Twitter users followed the Natwivity throughout Advent, when different figures from the world’s most famous story wrote 140-character updates each day.  It included Joseph, Mary, the shepherds, the three wise and King Herod.  Natwivity was organised by design company Share Creative and the Evangelical Alliance to bring the 2,000-year-old story to social media platforms.

The Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus video has been seen by over 24 million people on YouTube alone.  It’s a spoken word, a modern poem by a young man highlighting the difference between Jesus and false religion.

Dibden Youth has created an online community through our Facebook page.  We share information on upcoming events with the 96 people who are part of the page, but it goes well beyond using the page simply as a digital bulletin board.  We regularly pray for them, we inspire them with quotes from Christian saints, encouraging them to reflect.  All of this digital engagement reinforces the face-to-face engagement we have with them.  In addition, for example, in Holy Week we saw 21,147 engage in a range of images and videos we shared linked to Easter.  For an average church with a youth group we were able to reach a huge number of people.

Conclusion

The possibilities for the Kingdom in the online world are real, they’re here and now.  The invitation exists for anyone with access to the internet.  Transformation has started, and you are here to be part of it.  The testimonies of grace, forgiveness, redemption, and new life are echoing through cyberspace – if you listen.

Studies show that Christians are online, with their shiny gadgets in hand.  This is a wake-up call prompting you to get intentional about how you spend your time online – connecting, serving and leading the conversation in such a way that others will seek to know Christ personally.

Facebook Being Sued Over Like Button

facebook-like-dislike

The BBC has reported that Facebook is being sued for its use of the “like” button and other features of the social network.  It is being sued by a patent-holding company, Rembrandt Social Media, acting on behalf of a dead Dutch programmer called Joannes Jozef Everardus van Der Meer.

Rembrandt Social Media said Facebook’s success was based, in part, on using two of Mr Van Der Meer’s patents without permission.  Facebook said it had no comment to make on the lawsuit or its claims.

“We believe Rembrandt’s patents represent an important foundation of social media as we know it, and we expect a judge and jury to reach the same conclusion based on the evidence,” said lawyer Tom Melsheimer from legal firm Fish and Richardson, which represents the patent holder.

Rembrandt now owns patents for technologies Mr Van Der Meer used to build a fledgling social network, called Surfbook, before his death in 2004.  Mr Van Der Meer was granted the patents in 1998, five years before Facebook first appeared.  Surfbook was a social diary that let people share information with friends and family and approve some data using a “like” button, according to legal papers filed by Fish and Richardson.  The papers also say Facebook is aware of the patents as it has cited them in its own applications to patent some social networking technologies.

Do you think the Like button is something that can and should be patented? Tell us your thoughts on the suit in the comments.

m4s0n501

Subway’s 11-inch Footlong

11 inch subway footlong

Last week, Australian teenager Matt Corby uploaded a photograph showing an 11-inch Subway sandwich. The original Facebook post has since been deleted, but Subway did respond to Corby.

“Hi, Matt. Thanks for writing. Looking at this photo, this bread is not baked to our standards,” Subway wrote on Thursday in response to his post.

“We have policies in place to ensure that our fresh baked bread is consistent and has the same great taste no matter which Subway restaurant around the world you visit. We value your feedback and want to thank you again for being a fan.”

If it were just one sandwich, the picture probably would not have gone viral, but apparently it touched a nerve with sub sandwich eaters.  Quite a few other Facebook users posted similar pictures of a Subway footlong as 11 inches or a bit less. By the time Subway Australia responded in the comments of this Facebook post, they could no longer pretend it was an isolated incident.

Subway Facebook page

So if a Subway Footlong®  is not intended to be a measurement of length, does the same logic apply to a 6-inch sandwich, which is made from cutting a Footlong® in half?

I have not seen a picture of a 13 inch sandwich, at least not yet. A quick survey of New York City sandwiches found four out of seven at 11 or 11.5 inches.

Some say that the internet uproar over an inch of sandwich is silly. Others point out some of the greater implications of the controversy:

  • What happens if the Footlong® was actually only ten or even nine inches?
  • What if we decided the physical money we pay for the sandwiches with was not intended to be a measurement of money?

So what do you think – is this a tempest in a teapot or a place where customers should draw the line?

How to survive being 13 by a 14 year old

Be careful what pictures you put on Facebook …

A Netmums survey suggests that 13 is the most difficult age of all.  A 14-year-old has written a fantastic piece in The Guardian explaining how to get through it, well worth a read:

According to a Netmums survey, 13 is the most difficult age. But it’s not only parents who find it hard going – it’s tough for the teenagers too. Here’s how to make it through to being 14, by Miranda Smith, aged 14 and four months.

1. Don’t put up pictures of yourself on Facebook with a bottle of WKD beside you and a comment like: “Got SO drunk last night.” No one thinks it’s cool – and WKD is only 4% proof.

2. You’re going to feel a whole lot more grumpy when you’re 13 than you did at 12. But the thing is it’s not just you – every other 13-year-old feels exactly the same. Knowing that helps a bit.

3. It’s tempting, but try not to be on your phone 24/7. It really bugs your parents but, worse, it’s boring for your friends.

4. Thirteen is the age when you’re likely to start getting attention from the opposite sex. Don’t get carried away by this – there’s nothing more moist than a lovesick 13-year-old.

5. Don’t send pictures of yourself in your underwear to ANYONE – because they’ll end up being spread around, and you’ll regret it.

6. Your friends will annoy you, make you angry and get on your nerves. But don’t insult them on Twitter – 13-year-olds do that all the time. Twitter is a public forum, and if you start tweeting about your issues anyone can get involved even if it’s none of their business.

7. A few months ago, you hardly thought about your body at all. Now it’s the only thing on your mind. Of course your body matters: but the thing to think is that no one else notices it as much as you do. So try to chill about it.

8. At precisely the moment when you decide there’s no better way to spend a Saturday than staying in bed til late afternoon, your parents will become obsessed with you doing the chores for them. Rule of thumb: you can only say, “I’ll do it later,” five times. After that, just do it.

9. Thirteen-year-olds have massive fights with their friends, all the time. A year on, you won’t even remember what those fights were about – but you will remember how unhappy they made you feel.

10. Plan a really good party for when you reach 14. When the parents say they want to be around you’ll think, “OMG no,” … but it’s probably going to be best to let them stay. Agree on the conditions, and stick to your side of the bargain provided they stick to theirs.

75% of homeless youth use Facebook and Twitter

Homeless Person

A recent study found that 75% of homeless young people use social networks to stay connected to others – a number comparable to that of university and college students.

The study, led by the University of Alabama’s Rosanna Guadagno, surveyed 237 college and 65 homeless young people that were an average of 19 years old.  A vast majority of both groups reported using social media networks such as Twitter and Facebook for at least one hour each day.

Over 90 percent of college students reported using social media programs for at least one hour every day.

Guadagno makes the argument that a “digital divide” in Internet access should be re-thought:

“To the extent that our findings show a ‘digital divide’ between undergraduates at a four-year university and age-matched participants in a program for homeless young adults, it is mainly in types of Internet use and not access to the Internet, and that divide is relatively minor.  Since it is clear that the proportions of undergraduates and homeless young adults accessing social networking sites are similar, we assert that the term digital divide is not descriptive of the young adult population.”

Another recent study from the University of Dayton found that homeless youth are closely linked to social media in their daily lives. They don’t only use such networks for social contact and equality, but as a means to solve practical daily issues.

Art Jipson, the head of the Dayton study, found that the homeless use social media as a place where all people are treated “equally,” and through a series of interviews, discovered that it can also be a medium to find social services, somewhere to sleep and their next hot meal.

I’d be interested to know if any similar research has occurred in the UK with the ever increasing group of sofa surfer teenagers.