Upcoming funding deadline: Comic Relief Tech for Good 2018

Comic Relief Tech for Good 2018 funding stream has an upcoming deadline.  The fund is well worth looking at for youth work projects.

Deadline: 20 December 2017

Who can apply? Not-for-profit groups in the UK

How much? Between £15,000 and £47,000

What for?

This programme aims to provide the opportunity for not-for-profit organisations, who already have some technological capacity, to take their digital innovation projects forward. We are looking to fund teams to make a significant digital step forward within nine months.

A wide range of digital interventions will be considered and our aim is to fund projects that:

  • Are focused on specific user needs in their design, delivery and development
  • Make best use of web, mobile or internet based technologies
  • Can scale effectively and offer economies of scale
  • Disrupt and challenge existing ways of delivering services
  • Are sharable with other parts of the not-for-profit sector

We are looking to fund more than just good ideas. We want to fund projects that will deliver bigger, better and more ambitious services to users and beneficiaries. Applicants need to demonstrate that they understand how to manage a successful digital project, and that they have sound internal or external technical expertise in their management and delivery team. We would expect that some development work will already have taken place.

Projects must address one of our four programme areas:

  • Empowering Women and Girls,
  • Investing in Children and Young People,
  • Building Stronger Communities, or
  • Improving Health and Wellbeing. 

How to apply:   Apply online

Government must invest in children’s & youth services

Leading children’s charities and local councils have called on the Government to urgently close the funding gap facing children and young people’s services as new research reveals a sharp rise in families reaching “crisis point”.

An open letter signed by five major organisations warns that children’s social care is being pushed to breaking point, with a £2bn funding gap expected to open by 2020. It urges ministers to “step up” and use the Autumn Budget to invest in vital services in order to save youngsters from serious harm.

The signatories, which include Barnardo’s, Action for Children and the Local Government Association (LGA), state that between them they have “spent years warning successive governments that a failure to invest in these vital services will have long term consequences” for the UK’s children and families.

The letter, comes as a report by three leading children’s charities reveals “crippling” central government cuts have left councils with no option but to close services designed to detect early signs of child neglect and abuse – forcing them to direct to a “crisis” fire-fighting model.

Demand for crisis support for children has risen sharply as council spending on services that are designed to spot signs of neglect and abuse early has fallen by 40 per cent between 2010/11 and 2015/16, the report shows. Central government funding for children and young people’s services has seen a real terms decrease of £2.4bn in that period, while local authority allocations for these services has fallen by £1.6bn.

At the same time, there has been a 108 per cent increase in child protection investigations, as demand for council help soars.

The research, from The Children’s Society, Action for Children and the National Children’s Bureau, also reveals stark geographical discrepancies, with the most deprived councils in England having cut spending on children’s services by almost a quarter (23 per cent) – six times as much as the least deprived councils.

The open letter to ministers reads:

“Children’s social care is being pushed to breaking point, with an unprecedented surge in demand leaving services across the public, voluntary and community sector struggling to cope.

“We believe that all children deserve the chance of a bright future. That’s why we are uniting today to urge the Government to use the Autumn Budget to close the funding gap facing children’s services, which will reach at least £2bn by 2020.”

It states that the number of children needing child protection plans has nearly doubled over the past decade, and last year saw the largest annual increase in children in care since 2013. The organisations also highlight that local authorities overspent on children’s services by £365m in 2014/15 just to keep children safe, and a huge £605m the following year.

The letter adds:

“Our children and young people deserve better than the gradual decline of services – particularly those services that help children early – that have been shown to make a real difference to their lives”

“Councils and the voluntary sector are committed to getting the best for every child. Now we need the same commitment from our government, starting with urgent action through the Budget to give local services the resources they need to help children and families thrive.”

The number of young people subject to child protection enquires increased by 140 per cent – to 170,000 – in the past decade, according to research by the LGA earlier this year.

A separate study more recently revealed that benefit cuts and increased levels of poverty across the UK were the primary cause for this “unprecedented surge” in demand for children’s services, while a lack of resources to provide universal services like children’s centres and youth clubs also played a significant part.

 

 

Children’s & youth work links

Links from the world of children’s and youth ministry:

‘Harry Potter’ author J.K. Rowling opens up about books’ Christian imagery: ‘They almost epitomise the whole series,’ she says of the Scripture Harry reads in Godric’s Hollow.

Youth Court Protocol – what’s new?: The MA Youth Court Protocol was originally developed in 2003 as additional guidance for magistrates on the practices and processes of the youth justice system, but it has evolved to be a useful resource for all those who come into contact with the youth court.

Applications for grants to support British Science Week 2018 are now open: There are three grant schemes available to support British Science Week (9-18 March 2018) activities: one for schools, one for community groups (including youth clubs), and one for BSA branches.

Poor white boys are the new oppressed: Trevor Phillips, ex-head of the Commission for Racial Equality, writes a fascinating article on how recent statistics shows “every chance that while the Sikh teenager will one day turn into a highly skilled doctor, the grime-music obsessed African sixth-former will become a pin-striped lawyer, and that mathematics-nut Chinese GCSE student will end up a tech entrepreneur, the best that your average working-class white boy can hope for is a part-time job in an Amazon warehouse.”

These 4 reasons are why youth workers are leaving the church: James Ballantyne blogs on why he believes youth workers are leaving the church – this is essential reading for church leaders.

 

 

Get £10,000 to help the environment

Environmental issues are already presenting challenges to how we live, but what are we doing about it? Digital technology can help create solutions and lead us to a greener, better world. As a generation, we have the innovation, skills and passion to drive positive change, so we want you to get thinking about the environmental problems we all face, and how digital tech can help solve them.

If you have got an idea to help the environment, such as improving energy efficiency, reducing waste or increasing recycling, and you are aged between 17 and 24, then you could apply for up to £10,000 from The Environment Now to bring your idea to life!

SO WHAT EXACTLY IS THE ENVIRONMENT NOW?

 

The Environment Now  funds young people’s ideas to tackle energy efficiency, waste reduction and recycling, using the power of tech. Successful applicants get £10,000 to develop their idea over 10 months, as well as mentorship, work experience and insight days with industry professionals. It’s funded by O2 and the National Lottery’s Big Lottery Fund through the Our Bright Future programme, and managed by the National Youth Agency.

If you feel inspired to tackle environmental problems with digital tech, the next deadline for project applications is looming – 14 November . You can find out more and apply for an Environment Now grant of £10,000 here.

WHAT KIND OF PROJECTS CAN GET FUNDING?

If you have an idea of how digital technology could help the environment, The Environment Now want to hear from you!

They’ve already funded projects like…

LettusGrow: a company on a mission to reduce food waste around the world through soil-free gardening.

Filamentive: a 3D printing filament business that needs money for experimentation, research and development into new recycled and recyclable materials.

Virtually There:  an app that will contain different virtual reality experiences highlighting the impact of global warming, waste and deforestation.

For more information on other projects The Environment Now have already funded, take a look here.

HOW CAN I APPLY?

Applications for funding are open until 14th November. Go to The Environment Now website to read the full criteria and apply for funding!

If you have any questions about funding or Thinkspiration events, you can contact the team at The Environment Now here.

£18,000 Grants For Charities To Redevelop Their Website

 

The Transform Foundation is pleased to announce the launch of the 2017 funding round of its Charity Website Grant Programme, which will be providing £18,000 grants to charities to fund the redevelopment of their website.  If you are a charity interested in receiving funding to redevelop your website then click here to be taken to the Transform Foundation website for more information on the grant programme and how you can apply.

The Transform Foundation is a charity that provides grants and other resources to the charity sector to fund innovative digital projects.  The Charity Website Grant Programme forms part of their wider efforts to support the charity sector in effectively making the transition from traditional forms of fundraising and service delivery towards more digitally focused models.

The 2017 funding round follows the successful pilot funding round in 2016 which funded the development of websites that have already gone on to raise hundreds of thousands pounds online for the successful applicants.

The grant is principally aimed at charities with annual incomes between £500k and £30m, although smaller charities with ambitious plans for digital can also apply.  Larger charities will also be considered for specific project or fundraising sites.

Any type of non-profit organisation may apply, with successful applicants in the past including causes as diverse as community development, disability, education, theatre, mental health, hospices, national heritage, volunteering, family, children & youth, addiction, homelessness, international aid, and arts.

To apply for the grant or find out more details on it, visit the Transform Foundation website at: www.transformfoundation.org.uk

 

New £150m grant scheme for youth work

paul-hamlyn-foundation

Youth organisations will be able to apply for cash to support their work as part of a £150m grant scheme launched by The Paul Hamlyn Foundation (PHF).The Foundation will be providing £25m a year until 2021 across its range of funds.  A total of £4m a year has been set aside for organisations working with marginalised young people.

As part of the organisation’s six strategic priorities, it wants to “support the development and growth of organisations investing in young people and positive change”.  To do this they’ve developed two new funds: a Youth Fund and a Growth Fund.

The Youth Fund, which will provide funding of between £10,000 and £60,000, is intended to help organisations by covering a proportion of core operating costs.  The foundation said it expects to make up to 30 awards a year through the fund.

“This is a direct response to feedback – that in order to achieve greatest positive impact in the lives of young people, organisations need to achieve a balance of stability, continuity and flexibility,” the organisation’s strategy document for 2015 to 2021 states.

The Growth Fund will provide funding and support to help organisations identify and implement practical steps to growth.  It will be launched later this year and is by invitation only.

Other funds being run by the foundation include the Shared Ground Fund, which will provide support to help explore new approaches to assisting young migrants in need, and two art funds intended to enrich young people’s lives and education through art.

Moira Sinclair, chief executive of the Foundation, said:

“PHF’s mission remains ambitious and has never been more relevant.  At a time of continued austerity and significant social and economic challenges, trusts and foundations can play a vital role in supporting innovation, and backing people with game-changing ideas, as well as providing long-term support and funding.  Most importantly, our focus must be on helping people, especially young people, overcome disadvantage and realise their full potential.”

Grants to help Transform Communities

Empowering Churches & Communities

The Church and Community Fund’s Quarter 2 2013 Committee meeting held on the 7th June,  awarded grants totalling £85,000 to 7 projects under funding themes one and two. Four grants were awards to projects that aim to significantly expand the Church’s engagement with neighbourhood renewal and improve the quality of life for those in the community. A further three grants were awarded to projects that have sought innovative ways of developing established community engagement to grow the Church. A full list of supported projects can be found here.