The experiences of 11-16 year olds on social networking sites

The NSPCC earlier this week launched a new research report into the experiences of 11-16 year olds on social networking sites and the strategies they use to deal with things that upset them online.  Researchers conducted an online self completion survey in December 2012 of 1,024 11-16 year olds in the UK.

NSPCC Report Cover

Here’s some of the key findings:

  • Over one in four (28%) of children aged 11-16 with a profile on a social networking site have experienced something upsetting on it in the last year.
  • Of the children and young people who were upset, 11% were dealing with upsetting experiences on a daily basis.
  • The most reported issue experienced on social networking sites was trolling, experienced by 37% of children who had been upset.
  • Other issues experienced by children who had been upset included: pressure to look or act a certain way (14%), cyber stalking (12%), aggressive and violent language (18%), encouragement to hurt themselves (3%), receiving unwanted sexual messages (12%), and requests to send or respond to a sexual message (8%).
  • Over half of 11-16 year olds (58%) believed at least one of the people responsible for the behaviour which had upset or bothered them was either a complete stranger, someone they only knew online, or they did not know who it was at all.
  • Only 22% of the children who were upset talked with someone else face to face about the experience.

Download the full report from the NSPCC: The experiences of 11-16 year olds on social networking sites.

Analysis of Wikipedia has shown that Jesus Is ‘The Most Significant Person Ever’

historical-jesus

Two computer scientists have completed an analysis of Wikipedia data, and found that Jesus Christ is the single “most significant figure in human history.”

To come up with their top 10 list of significant humans, the researchers looked at individuals who have impacted opinions and movements over time, according to entries in the online encyclopedia. Napoleon, Shakespeare, Muhammad and Abraham Lincoln rounded out the top five, followed by George Washington, Hitler, Alexander the Great and Thomas Jefferson.  The researchers said that the lack of women on the list was a result of gender inequality views throughout history.

One of the professors behind the algorithms told the Pacific Standard,

“We would call Jesus ‘The most significant person ever.’ With over 2 billion followers a full 2,000 years after his death, Jesus is an incredibly successful historical meme”

Digital Child: Discussion 1

Key points from the small groups:

  • Tone on the internet can often be unhelpfully aggressive
  • Still an interest on elitism as not everyone has access to internet or devices.
  • Difference of digital v broadcast
  • Is social media going to change the church
  • Children looking for participation models and critiquing evidence and sources – who do we do this
  • How there are some parts of technology that has been well embraced in churches and others bit not so well embraced – e.g. subtitling for worship and video not happening.
  • Who owns inclusion in the church and own this?  This requires the need to be organised.

Some big comments and threads:

  • People uses the medium to ram home the old message, the debate between command and control people and discipleship and empowerment people is a big debate which social media sit sin the middle of.
  • Has the church ever understood what participation is – for all adults we are still in broadcast church even though we understand that learning styles are critical.
  • Multi-voice church recommended – are we returning to a more participative method.
  • It is both and – broadcast is when we say Jesus is Lord, and the participation is discipleship – we’ve focussed on evangelism in the last few hundred years but don’t shift too far so that we throw the baby out with the bath water and forget evangelism due to discipleship.
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