Children’s & youth work links

Links from the world of children’s and youth ministry:

Children’s & youth work links

Links from around the world of children’s and youth work:

What happened when 9 teens gave up their mobile phones for a week: anyone who has worked with teenagers for more than 5 minutes know how connected to their mobiles they are.  So what happens if they were separated from their mobile lifelines for a full week?

The Smart Talk is a website that helps parents and kids come up with a set of mobile phone rules together, and creates a handy agreement you can print out.  This tool is more than a simple checklist; it’s meant to start conversations between parents and their child.

What I Teach My Students About Alcohol: Austin McCann shares what he taught his young people about drinking alcohol from the Bible.

Teens Tell All: Your Guide To Teen Slang, From Bae To Woke: As part of TODAY’s “Teens Tell All” series, they asked teenagers to enlighten adults about all those mysterious terms they throw out when they talk or message.

Jesus was a Youth Minister: Jesus’ disciples were mainly young men.  This makes Peter the perfect, Biblical example of what it looks like to mentor a teenager!

 

Traffic lights in the ground help teenagers avoid traffic

In Germany they call them “smombies” – or smartphone zombies – people who are so caught up in their device they roam the streets oblivious to other people, traffic or rogue lamp posts.

Now this particular breed of tech junkie has been given special traffic lights — installed into the pavements — to help them avoid oncoming traffic.

Officials in Augsburg in the Bavaria region have built lights into the pavement at two tram stops in the city, The Local reports, which flash red when a tram is approaching or the normal lights turn red.

They’re designed to catch the eye of anyone craning their neck to get through that last Candy Crush level before they board and alert them when a relatively quiet trains approaching.

 

Tobias Harms from the city’s council told reporters:

“We realised that the normal traffic light isn’t in the line of sight of many pedestrians these days.  So we decided to have an additional set of lights — the more we have, the more people are likely to notice them.”

Several pedestrians are said to have been hit by the trains while looking at their phones recently, and a 15-year-old was reportedly hit and killed after being distracted by her device in Munich in March.

Student Safety

West Yorkshire Police have published a helpful post on Student Crime Prevention Tips:

Burglary Tips

  • Be Safe, Be Secure – Burglary
  • Keep your doors and windows locked when you go out
  • Mark your property with your University and Student Number
  • Don’t leave cash and valuables on display in your room
  • Leave a light or radio on when you go out, to give the impression someone is in – maybe use a timer switch.
  • Make sure your mobile is with you all the time, but don’t have it on display

Check our West Yorkshire Police burglary campaign on “It only takes a minute”


Personal Safety

  • Avoid walking alone after dark.
  • Keep to busy, well lit roads and try to look confident even if you don’t feel it.
  • If you think you are being followed, cross the road and keep walking. If it continues head for a busy area or lighted house to ask for help.
  • Get a personal attack alarm and carry it in your hand.
  • Carry your bag close to you with the fastening next to your body, but if someone tries to get it, let it go.
  • Keep your house keys in your pocket for easy access.
  • When you go out, tell people what time you expect to arrive home.
  • When out at night, get a taxi or someone you trust to take you home.
  • Always sit in the back of the taxi.
  • Don’t be tempted to hitch a ride or accept a lift from someone you don’t know.

Mobile Phone Safety

Only make essential calls in the street. Using a mobile phone in a busy area advertises the fact that you have a piece of valuable property and while talking on the phone you are distracted and not aware of who might be watching you or who might be a potential thief. Use them out of public view and somewhere where you can see what it happening around you.
Many mobile phones are stolen in places like pubs and nightclubs when they are left on a bar, table or on a nearby seat. Open handbags also prove tempting for thieves, as do carried rucksacks, coats left hanging on chairs and phones left unattended in vehicles and other places.
Security mark your phone with a postcode and house number using an ultra-violet pen. The best place is underneath the battery near to the SIM card and on the back of the battery.

A mobile phone can be identified through two numbers:

  • The phone number unique to the SIM card.
  • The IMEI (International Mobile Equipment Identity) number which is unique to the phone handset.

Currently when police take crime reports the SIM card number is recorded only. The victim then contacts their phone network provider. The policy is then to send a blocking signal out to the SIM card rendering it useless. Criminals have picked up on this and they discard the SIM card straightaway after stealing the phone. They are then left with a handset that can be sold on in a pub or to a local dealer who then only has to buy a legitimate SIM card and the phone is once again operational with no way of detection.

However it is possible for any person to find out the IMEI number of a handset by putting the following code into the phone *#06# (star, hash, zero, six, hash). This means that if Police were to record the IMEI number then we would have a chance of detecting persons using stolen handsets.

Police are now urging mobile phone users to key in the *#06# number and record their IMEI number so in the event of the phone being stolen the police have a chance of arresting a person who may subsequently use the handset. IMEI numbers will now be recorded by the Police and checked against suspected stolen mobile phones. Also see : The Government’s new Mobile Phone Crime website :www.immobilise.com (external link).


Vehicle Safety

  • Always lock your vehicle – never leave a car door unlocked or a window or sunroof open even when just going into a shop for a moment or two.
  • Always try to park in a well-lit, open location.
  • Don’t leave any valuables in your car and never leave items on display – lock them in the boot.
  • Don’t leave credit cards or cheque books in the glove compartment. 1 in 5 stolen cheque and credit cards are taken from cars.
  • Never leave your vehicle documents in the car – they could help a thief to sell it.
  • Security mark your stereo and if it’s removable, always take it with you. Make a note of the serial number and keep it in a safe place.

Taxi

There are different types of taxis and knowing the difference is important. Taxis are black and white and these can be legally hailed at the side of the road. Private hire taxis (such as Premier or Amber Cars) cannot be hailed legally at the side of the road as they are personal vehicles and must be booked in advance.

If you do not book a private hire taxi in advance you are not insured if the driver has an accident. Make sure you only use black and white taxis when hailing them at the side of the road, or pre-book your private hire taxi in advance.

Only use licensed taxis, do not accept lifts of people pretending to be a taxi. Make sure the driver is either wearing or displaying their ID badge. Make sure you tell a friend (if travelling alone) when and where you are going and try keep a record of the taxis company name, number plate and ID badge number if possible if anything does go wrong and you need to make a complaint.


Drink Spiking

Drink spiking occurs when a substance, such as drugs or alcohol, is added to your drink without you knowing about it.This may affect how you act or behave with other people.

If your drink has been spiked, the way you feel will depend on which drug has been used but you may feel drowsy, confused and find it difficult to speak or move. You may also feel more drunk than you should be given the amount of drink you have consumed. When these feelings have passed you may not be able to remember what happened.

Ways to avoid being Spiked:

  • Never accept a drink from someone you don’t know
  • Use a specially adapted cover for your glass or bottle
  • Never leave your drink unattended
  • Plan your night out if you can
  • Appoint a drink watcher if you go to the toilet or off for a dance.
  • Remember alcohol affects your reactions; you’ll be less alert.
  • Don’t feel that soft drinks aren’t spiked…they are!
  • If you think for one moment that your drink has been tampered with, don’t take a chance. Get another one.
  • And remember, males also fall victim to this type of offence.

For more information check out NHS website which has useful information on symptoms, what to do and prevention.


One Punch

As part of West Yorkshire Police’s ongoing work to reduce violent crime the Force is raising awareness of how a night out can lead to a fight and the loss of a life.

The ‘One Punch Can Kill’ campaign reminds people that in a split second a person can become a killer or be killed.

We want everyone to be able to enjoy the pubs and clubs in the towns and cities in West Yorkshire, but would encourage people to consider how much alcohol they consume.  What can start out as a fun night drinking with friends can easily turn into a nightmare.  Just one punch can ruin the lives of both the victim and the person who throws the punch.

West Yorkshire Police are committed to tackling violent crime and will continue our efforts to reduce the numbers of victims, but we need people to play their part by thinking about their actions before they get involved in a fight on a night out.

Watch our One Punch is all it takes Video


Clubbing/Bar Safety

Thefts from clubbers and bar goes rose by nearly a quarter in the last year, and anyone who becomes a victim faces the expense and inconvenience of replacing the stolen items along with the heartache of losing treasured photos, videos and others items.

You can guard against becoming a victim of theft by:

  • Always securing zips and fastenings on bags and pockets.
  • Never leaving bags, mobile phones, coats and other valuables unattended.
  • Avoiding advertising your valuables to would-be thieves.

You can also protect your mobile phone by:

  • Downloading a tracking app.
  • Insuring it, and recording the IMEI number.
  • Saving all your contacts, in and address book or on a computer.

Over the coming months, officers will be handing out crime prevention advice and speaking to people in city centres about ways to avoid becoming a victim.

‘Operation Dancefloor aims to raise awareness of a recent rise in such thefts among shoppers and clubbers, by encouraging people to take simple steps to avoid becoming a victim.


Drugs

Cannabis is still Illegal

Despite what some people say, cannabis is still an illegal drug.

If you are caught in possession of it, or are dealing it to your mates – you could be arrested.
This could lead to you placed in a cell and a possible court appearance, as well as a conviction which could affect your future employment prospects
There are also the well documented health risks, physical and psychological hazards, mental health issues and the long-term risk of lung cancer.
If you need help kicking the habit, see the “getting help” section on Talk To Frank


Did You Know?

You can also check policing and safety information for the area where you live by inserting your postcode into our Neighbourhood Policing Team (NPT) website. We encourage you to sign up for free regular updates via email from your local policing team – more details on the site. Check out the local policing NPT Website

11 year old fakes being kidnapped to avoid parents evening!

A boy in Spain was dreading a planned parents evening.  He had not done well in school, so he anticipated a bad meeting. Fortunately, he came up with a brilliant solution:

Early on Monday afternoon the unnamed 11-year-old son of a Spanish police officer stationed in the north-western town of Xinzo de Limia sent a text message from his mobile phone to tell his father he had been kidnapped.

When his father phoned back, the boy confirmed the worst. He had been snatched off the street as he was putting out the rubbish, he said, and was locked in the boot of a car. He had no idea where his kidnappers were taking him, but knew that the car he was in was a blue Seat. […]

It was only two hours later that the boy’s father noticed the keys to a spare flat owned by the family were missing.

The child was soon discovered there and reportedly explained that he had been terrified by the prospect of his parents going to school to speak to his teachers.

Read the full story here

How to survive being 13 by a 14 year old

Be careful what pictures you put on Facebook …

A Netmums survey suggests that 13 is the most difficult age of all.  A 14-year-old has written a fantastic piece in The Guardian explaining how to get through it, well worth a read:

According to a Netmums survey, 13 is the most difficult age. But it’s not only parents who find it hard going – it’s tough for the teenagers too. Here’s how to make it through to being 14, by Miranda Smith, aged 14 and four months.

1. Don’t put up pictures of yourself on Facebook with a bottle of WKD beside you and a comment like: “Got SO drunk last night.” No one thinks it’s cool – and WKD is only 4% proof.

2. You’re going to feel a whole lot more grumpy when you’re 13 than you did at 12. But the thing is it’s not just you – every other 13-year-old feels exactly the same. Knowing that helps a bit.

3. It’s tempting, but try not to be on your phone 24/7. It really bugs your parents but, worse, it’s boring for your friends.

4. Thirteen is the age when you’re likely to start getting attention from the opposite sex. Don’t get carried away by this – there’s nothing more moist than a lovesick 13-year-old.

5. Don’t send pictures of yourself in your underwear to ANYONE – because they’ll end up being spread around, and you’ll regret it.

6. Your friends will annoy you, make you angry and get on your nerves. But don’t insult them on Twitter – 13-year-olds do that all the time. Twitter is a public forum, and if you start tweeting about your issues anyone can get involved even if it’s none of their business.

7. A few months ago, you hardly thought about your body at all. Now it’s the only thing on your mind. Of course your body matters: but the thing to think is that no one else notices it as much as you do. So try to chill about it.

8. At precisely the moment when you decide there’s no better way to spend a Saturday than staying in bed til late afternoon, your parents will become obsessed with you doing the chores for them. Rule of thumb: you can only say, “I’ll do it later,” five times. After that, just do it.

9. Thirteen-year-olds have massive fights with their friends, all the time. A year on, you won’t even remember what those fights were about – but you will remember how unhappy they made you feel.

10. Plan a really good party for when you reach 14. When the parents say they want to be around you’ll think, “OMG no,” … but it’s probably going to be best to let them stay. Agree on the conditions, and stick to your side of the bargain provided they stick to theirs.

Do You Have What It Takes to Be the New Siri?

Siri

Siri is not a woman who lives inside your phone but a computer programme organising your life.

Siri is now in need of some new writers to put together jokes, witty banter, and other various bits of human-sounding things for Siri to say.  Apple posted the job on LinkedIn, so get your résumé together.  They clearly need some sort of a new writer, because if they really think “Siri’s known for ‘her’ wit, cultural knowledge, and zeal to explain things in engaging, funny, and practical ways,” then they’re more out of touch than anyone guessed …

Franciscan Friars want you to text your prayers

HOLY NAME PROVINCE TEXT A PRAYER

Just a month after Pope Benedict XVI launched his official Twitter account, other representatives of the Catholic faith are giving new meaning to the term, “religious text.”

The Holy Name Province, self-described as the largest group of friars in the USA, announced that they are now accepting prayer intentions via text.

Called “Text a Prayer Intention to a Franciscan Friar,” the program encourages participants to text the word “PRAYER” to 306-44, according to a release. Senders will then receive a welcome message inviting them to submit their prayer intentions. After they are sent in, participants will receive another text confirming that their prayer has been received and will be prayed for.

Father David Convertino, executive director of development for the Franciscan Friars of Holy Name Province, said in a statement:

“With technology changing the way we communicate, we needed to offer people an updated way to ask for prayers for special intentions and needs either for themselves or others”

I see this as a great use of technology, an organisation which has existed for years, which many would see as irrelevant offering a connection in a thoroughly credible manner. Do you think text messaging is a good way for religious bodies to connect with their followers? Discuss in the comments below.