Want to join the Hampshire & Isle of Wight Youth Commission?

The Hampshire Police and Crime Commissioner, Michael Lane, is seeking volunteers aged between 14 and 25 years old to help give young people a voice on the crime and policing issues that matter to them most.

The purpose of the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Youth Commission is to make young people part of the solution to tackling crime and improving policing, rather than being seen as part of the problem. It is made up of up to 50 young people aged between 14 and 25.

The Youth Commission currently has four priorities:
• Mental Health
• Hate Crime
• Cyber Safety
• Unhealthy Relationships

Youth Commission members identify the issues that young people are concerned about most and gather opinions on what the specific concerns are and ideas on how to tackle them. They also work to raise awareness and educate young people via campaigns, such as this year’s #GoFISH cyber safety campaign, run workshops, speak at events and take part in a range of other activities.

Members of the Youth Commission gain a variety of skills, meet and work with a range of people, learn about different issues that are relevant to them and their peers and get to be part of some great youth orientated events – this year members have attended festivals, youth conferences and summer activity schemes.

If you are interested is applying (or know someone that maybe interested) then please complete the online application form by 03 November 2017 which can be found here . This is the first part of the two stage application process.

Applicants that reach the second stage will be invited to an assessment evening week commencing 20th November. Applicants with experience of the police and criminal justice systems, as an offender, victim or any other interaction are welcome to apply.

Get Inspired Southampton

A free fun interactive event for young people aged 10 – 16 years, Get Inspired showcases the wide range of employment opportunities available in the region. Running on Saturday 14th October, 10.00am until 3.00pm at the O2 Guildhall for FREE.
With many high profile businesses and employers in the city exhibiting with hands-on interactive activities, this event is a great way of helping young people to learn about the various careers and training options that are right on their doorstep, planting a seed to raise their career aspirations from an early age and inspiring them to aim high.
 

Have your say on Ashurst Hospital vision

Ashurst Hospital in the New Forest needs a new lease of life and there is an exciting opportunity to redevelop facilities on the site to make it modern, welcoming and fit for purpose, now and in the future.

Working with our local healthcare partners, West Hampshire Clinical Commissioning Group has started to build a vision. We want to create a child and family friendly Health Centre which focuses on providing a range of services for our children, young people and families living in the New Forest and Totton and Waterside areas.

The New Forest Birth Centre, CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services) and Hearing Screening are already based at Ashurst Hospital and there is room to turn our vision into a reality so we want to explore this opportunity further.

There are, of course, some restrictions on what can be provided in a local community health facility but your thoughts and ideas will help us to build a vision for the future and identify what health services and facilities for children, young people and families are important to you.

Please help us by answering this short survey: 6Ashurst Hospital Survey

New Forest sees a decrease in suicides

Deaths from suicide in the UK rose slightly from 6,122 deaths in 2014 to 6,188 deaths in 2015 with a subsequent increase in the rate from 10.8 to 10.9 deaths per 100,000 population according to the latest release from the ONS.

UK male suicide rate decreases whilst female rate increases to its highest rate in a decade.

England and Scotland saw decreases in the total number of suicides, whilst Wales and Northern Ireland saw increases.

Closer to home the New Forest saw a significant decrease from the 2014 figures to the 2015 figures:

hampshire-suicides-2002-2015

Community First New Forest seeks two additional Trustees

community-first-trustee

CFNF is a Council for Voluntary Service which supports voluntary and community groups across the New Forest and provides a range of services to those living in and around that area including community development, volunteer centre, children and young people’s services, transport, home improvements and New Forest Nightstop.

CFNF is now seeking two additional Trustees for its Board, one with legal experience and the other with financial experience.

The applicant with legal experience will probably be a practising or retired lawyer. In addition to a lawyer’s approach to the various issues affecting CFNF some knowledge of commercial agreements and/or employment law would be useful but is not essential. Although the role will include giving informal preliminary advice on legal issues CFNF consults outside lawyers on a formal basis when appropriate.

The applicant with financial experience should have or have had a financial qualification gained in the finance world with skills to analyse finance proposals, monthly and quarterly accounts and to set budgets. Experience in charity finance and pensions schemes is an advantage but is not essential. He or she should be willing to become a member of CFNF’s Finance Committee and to understudy the Treasurer.

The Board meets 5 times a year and also holds away days. All trustee positions are unpaid, but reasonable out of pocket expenses are covered. For further information on CFNF’s work please visit www.cfnf.org.uk

If you are interested in taking on either of these roles and/or need further information please contact Michael Clowes, Chief Executive, Community First New Forest, Archstone House, Pullman Way, Ringwood, Hampshire, BH24 1DH. email michael.clowes@cfnf.org.uk  tel: 01425 482773.

Ends

For further information contact:
Michael Clowes, Chief Executive, Community First New Forest on 01425 482773 or email michael.clowes@cfnf.org.uk

Hampshire Libraries

I’m a big fan of libraries.  I grew up regularly going into town to get out a wide range of books – especially biographies, sport and history books.

Hampshire Library Service, like so many others across the country, has been going through a review as part of the austerity measures.  A paper on ‘Library Service Transformation – Strategy to 2020‘ is due to be considered at the Culture & Communities Select Committee on 22nd March.

Hythe_LibraryWith my current role I find it difficult to make the time to regularly get to the library, let alone read for enjoyment.  But one of the best discoveries I made in recent years was the opportunity to download and read e-Magazines for free from the Hampshire Library Service.

More recently I’ve learnt that you can borrow up to 5 e-books and/or audio books for up to 14 days for free?  You can download eBooks and eAudio books onto your ereader, desktop, laptop or mobile device using Overdrive.

  • up to 5 items can be borrowed at a time
  • up to 14 day lending period depending on item
  • no charge for loans

For more information please do visit the Hampshire Library Service website.

 

Animal accidents map shows worst New Forest roads

I love living in the New Forest, but one of the worst bits is every so often driving past the scene of an animal that has been hit as it wandered into the road – many of these are fatal accidents.  Recently New Forest organisations have published a new map to highlight the worst roads for animal accidents.

New-Forest-Animal-Accidents-Map-2014

The map shows 138 accidents across the Forest in 2014, with more than a third of accidents taking place on just three roads:

  • B3078 from Cadnam to Godshill – 24 accidents
  • B3054 from Hatchet Pond to Portmore – 16 accidents
  • B3056 from Hatchet Pond to Lyndhurst – 13 accidents

A number of Forest organisations work together to reduce the number of accidents including the Verderers, the Commoners Defence Association, New Forest National Park Authority, Hampshire Constabulary, the Forestry Commission, New Forest District Council and Hampshire County Council.

The overall number of accidents fell in 2014 to 138 (from 181 in 2013). But Forest organisations are warning against any complacency, especially among motorists who travel across the Forest each day as most incidents involve people who live in or close to the New Forest. This is particularly important as many foals are born at this time of year.

Initiatives include fitting reflective pony collars, changing road warning signs to keep drivers’ attention, traffic calming measures, verge cutting to increase visibility and awareness campaigns.

Sue Westwood, Clerk to the Verderers, said: ‘New Forest ponies and cattle are free to roam the New Forest and it’s their grazing activity which shapes the iconic landscape. We hope this map will be a visual reminder to motorists to be aware of animals as they’re driving. Although accidents are spread across the Forest and their distribution changes every year, there are particular roads which always seem to have a high number of accidents.’

Nigel Matthews, Head of Recreation Management and Learning at the New Forest National Park Authority, said: ‘Local motorists should never assume that it won’t happen to them. One day that animal beside the road will step out at the last minute, so go slowly and give it a wide berth. The speed limit is 30 or 40mph for a reason. Animals are on the road day and night, and unfortunately have no fear of cars.’

Driving tips:

  • Be ready to stop – ponies may step out even when they’ve seen you approaching
  • Slow down, especially at night and when other cars are approaching with their headlights on
  • Give animals grazing by the side of the road a wide berth
  • Take extra care when there are animals on the verges on both sides of the road – they may cross to join their friends.
  • Consider travelling on the fenced roads (such as the A31, A337 and A35) so that you don’t have to cross the open Forest.
  • The faster you are going, the greater the damage will be to the animal, your car and your passengers – start your journey early so you don’t have to hurry.
  • If you witness or are involved in an accident involving a pony, donkey, cow, pig or sheep, call the Police (999 for an emergency or 101 if it’s not an emergency).

New Forest Nightstop

New Forest Nightstop

I received this recent mailing about New Forest Nightstop:

New Forest Nightstop is the only provider of emergency accommodation in the New Forest for young people age 16-24, who find themselves suffering homelessness and this is all done through the homes of trained and approved volunteers.  There is absolutely no other emergency provision; hostels or shelters, in the New Forest.  The first thing people usually say to me is ‘Are there really people homeless in the New Forest?’  Unfortunately, this is a reality that people are very much unaware of.  The forest is mainly an affluent area with a very rural spread.  This means that homelessness, as people usually understand it, goes very much unnoticed.  The young people we help are not the street-hardened rough sleepers people typically think of in regards to homelessness but everyday teenagers, suffering a crisis, in need of help and protection.

Through our team of 26 volunteers Nightstop provides free emergency overnight accommodation, meals, laundry, baths, travel costs, toiletries, start-up furniture, food parcel referrals, start-up home energy costs, practical support with benefit claims, housing forms and the progression of their housing case through housing panels, with a multi-agency approach to the best outcomes with the means we have.  But Nightstop hosts offers much more than this to a young person; a listening ear, a sense of belonging and trust, a future, protection from rape, drugs, abuse, increased employability, offering security to not only the young person but their education; 69% of young people who stayed in the last year were in education, training or employment.

New Forest Nightstop has just entered its 12th year and in that time we have provided over 2000 nights of safety to vulnerable young people from our local communities.  Our aim is to save them from reaching the streets and becoming victims there.  We are hard at work trying to bring an awareness of Nightstop and the tragedies it prevents to the communities around us.

But the reality is that, at the moment, we do not have enough hosts, particularly in the Hythe and Dibden area, for the number of young people needing help.

Please follow the link below to visit our website for a real insight into our work and activities.  You can read stories from the young people that have been supported by Nightstop, experiences of our volunteers and even watch our short film about homelessness in the New Forest.

I hope you have found this of interest and I look forward to hearing from you if you feel you can help us in any way.

Catriona Duncan
Nightstop Support Worker
Community First New Forest
Tel: 01425 478391

Email: Nightstopsupport@cfnf.org.uk

Web: www.newforestnightstop.org.uk

Slavery in the New Forest

Little Testwood Farm - slavery

I was shocked and saddened to read this headline: “Eight men rescued from suspected slavery Little Testwood Farm in Calmore“:

POLICE have rescued eight men from a site in Totton following an investigation into potential slavery and servitude.

Officers from Hampshire Constabulary, supported by the National Crime Agency, executed a warrant around 6am today at Little Testwood Farm on Salisbury Road, Calmore.  The men are aged between 21 and 46 and are a mix of Romanian, Latvian and Polish nationalities.  Police also recovered industrial equipment that is believed to have been stolen.

A 27-year-old man from Luton was arrested on suspicion of knowingly holding another person in slavery or servitude and remains in custody.

The men have been taken to a survivor reception centre where they are receiving emotional and practical support. The centre is run by officers from Amberstone, Hampshire Constabulary’s specialist interview support team, with assistance from the Red Cross, the Salvation Army, Hampshire County Council and the NHS.

Detective Inspector Phil Scrase from Southampton CID said:

“As this morning’s action shows, we’ll take swift action against anyone suspected of exploiting vulnerable members of society for their own gain.  We know that people are being trafficked, exploited and enslaved across the country including here in Hampshire.  I’d urge anyone with concerns, suspicions or information that could help our enquiries to contact us in confidence.  For example, if you’re being offered cheap labour that’s too good to be true for the amount it costs, ask yourself: who’s really paying?”

Anyone with information about slavery, servitude, exploitation or trafficking can call the police on 101 or 999 in an emergency.  If you don’t want to speak to the police directly, you can also call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 or the national slavery helpline on 0800 0121 700

Reindeer Get Reflecting Antlers

Reflective Antlers

In Lapland, where reindeer herds are kept as livestock, yet graze freely most of the year, a new technique is being used to reduce the number of reindeer struck by cars at night. I cannot make the Finnish Sami language article translate into English, but according to redditor og_nichander, the antlers are sprayed with a reflective material that only shows up when headlights shine on it. Therefore,  you won’t see eerie herds of antlers moving in the night – unless you are about to hit them with your car.

I wonder if it is something we could do in the New Forest – maybe paint stripes onto the wild donkeys and ponies?