Anti-Terror Attack Advice For Pupils Aged 11 To 16

Advice showing schoolchildren what to do if they are caught up in a terror attack is being made available to be taught in UK schools for the first time.

Young people aged 11 to 16 will be urged to run to safety, hide and tell police should they become involved in a gun or knife attack, in guidance said to go “way beyond the basic messaging” of previous campaigns.

An animated film, partly in the style of a comic strip, urges young people not to “waste time” taking pictures or videos of the scene, but instead to run away from danger. 

The film, entitled Run, Hide, Tell – The Story Of Nur, Edih and Llet, and specially-designed lesson plans will be made available to schools and youth organisations from Tuesday 14th November.

It also advises young people on what to do should they see something suspicious, and an extra lesson teaching basic first aid is being made available.

The lessons are not compulsory, but schools are being urged to use them to ensure the younger generation is prepared in the “unlikely event” of a terror attack, Metropolitan Police deputy assistant commissioner Lucy D’Orsi said.

D’Orsi said: “Whilst we cannot make these lessons mandatory in schools, I would strongly urge education providers and youth organisations to consider delivering this life-saving information to the 11- to 16-year-olds in their care.

“We appreciate this can be a difficult subject to speak to young people about, but we’ve carefully designed everything to be age-appropriate and we know from our research that this is information that young people want to be equipped with.”

The video and teaching materials, designed by counter-terror police and the PSHE Association, are available to download via the National Police Chiefs’ Council website.

Disrespect NoBody resource launched by Home Office and PSHE Association

The Home Office, Government Equalities Office, and the PSHE Association have worked together to develop a new teaching resource which supports the Government’s Disrespect NoBody campaign aimed at preventing abuse in teenage relationships.

 

The Disrespect NoBody campaign builds on the Government’s previous This is Abuse campaign, and is aimed at preventing abusive behaviours within relationships. The new teaching resource helps young people to understand what a healthy relationship is, to re-think their views of controlling behaviour, violence, abuse and consent and directs them to places to go for help and advice. It aims to help young people to develop key skills and attributes such as empathy, respect, communication and negotiation so that they can enjoy healthy relationships both as they grow up and in adulthood.

 

The new resource features session plans focussed on understanding teenage relationship abuse, consent and sharing sexual images. The discussion guide will develop as content for the campaign develops.

 

Download the Disrespect NoBody Discussion Guide here

 

PSHE Association warns against Ch4 ‘My Self-Harm Nightmare’ documentary

Channel 4

PSHE Association warns against using Ch4 ‘My Self-Harm Nightmare’ documentary in class 

The PSHE Association is deeply concerned about the content of the ‘My Self-Harm Nightmare’ Channel 4 documentary aired on Wednesday night which contains graphic depictions and description of self-harming, and therefore could be a ‘trigger’ to young people vulnerable to self-harm. We urge against any school using the documentary in the classroom for this reason.

Our Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing Advisor, Dr. Pooky Knightsmith, is a leading expert in this field and comments that:

“You should never go into too much detail about the technical details of self-harm or eating disorders as this could trigger unhealthy responses in any vulnerable individuals in your group. Talking about specific methods of self-harm can be instructive to vulnerable students.

These suggestions may also be taken on board by any students who are currently harming.

Graphic or extreme images of self-harm and eating disorders should also never be shown for the following reasons:

  • they act as a barrier to seeking help: if someone who self-harms sees images of more severe cases they are likely to feel that their own self-harming is not severe enough to be taken seriously/they’re not yet ‘doing it well enough’
  • they provide a target to be achieved, or a bench mark to strive to reach for those who are vulnerable to, or who are already self-harming or suffering from disordered eating.

Teachers cannot know who will be harming in their class but should assume that someone in the class is currently self harming, has self harmed in the past or is at risk of doing so in the future and should therefore exercise extreme caution.”

 

The Association is due to launch guidance this week on teaching about mental health and emotional wellbeing which will provide advice to schools on how to address these issues appropriately. The guidance will be free to download from: www.pshe-association.org.uk/emotionalhealth.