The Gospel According to Peanuts is a great book explaining Christian truth through the cartoons.  Robert L. Short doesn’t argue that every single Peanuts cartoon carries a theological message, but he does link a number of them.  He starts the book with a justification for Christians using and being involved in the arts as a means of spreading the Gospel to those around them. The fact that Charles Schulz himself was a Christian is irrelevant, as Short argues, Christians should embrace all manner of things which will allow them to connect with others in a more creative way.

Similar to Jesus’ parables, Short uses the cartoons to explain theology in an understandable way.  The book isn’t a light read, so not one to necessarily give to non-Christian friends, but as someone who has read more than my fair share of theology, it was an enjoyable read to see funny cartoons linked to theological truths.  Whilst a bit dated now, (it was written in 1990) Short shows how art and entertainment can help the church to communicate truth to people.

Chris
cskidd1983@gmail.com
Married to the amazing Sarah and raising Jakey, Daniel, Amelia, Josh & Jonah in our blended family. Passionate for Jesus, social work & sport.

0 thoughts on “Cape Town 2010: The lens through which we preach”

  1. I understand your perspective, Chris. On the other hand, I really appreciate the perspectives that these folks offered because so often they came from a cultural viewpoint that was so very different from my own – and indeed from many of the people at my table. I found Ruth Padilla’s talk to be VERY stretching to me simply because of this. So I thought it was good, as a kind of compare-and-contrast both with our table discussion and my own personal viewpoint.

  2. Thanks for the comment Justin, I’d agree, Ruth was fantastic. It was more a frustration with John Piper and Vaughan Roberts who especially spoke from their focus more than an exegesis of the passage.

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