The annual report on the state of poverty and social exclusion in the UK, from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the New Policy Institute has recently been published:

Key points

  • In the year to 2009/10, the child poverty rate fell to 29%, the second fall in two years. Child poverty fell by around one-seventh under the previous Labour Government.
  • The poverty rate for working-age adults without dependent children rose both in 2009/10 and over the last decade. It now stands at 20%.
  • The pensioner poverty rate, at 16%, is now around half the rate it was in 1997.
  • By mid-2011, six million people were unemployed, lacking but wanting work or working part-time because no full time job was available. Though no higher than the previous year, this was 2 million higher than in 2004.
  • On a range of education indicators at ages 11, 16 and 19, more pupils are reaching expected standards than in previous years, continuing long-term positive trends. Although closing slowly, the gaps between attainment levels of those on free school meals and other children are smaller than in previous years.
  • The proportion of households in fuel poverty has risen significantly in the last few years. Almost all households in the bottom tenth by income are in fuel poverty, as are half of households in the second bottom tenth.
  • Changes to the tax credit system mean that an additional 1.4m working households on low incomes now face marginal effective tax rates of over 70%.
  • The number of households accepted as homeless in England rose in 2010/11 for the first time since 2003/04 and now stands at 65,000. The number of court orders for mortgage repossessions in England and Wales rose to 21,000 in the first half of 2011, the first significant rise for three years.

Here are some key infographics that sum up the report:

Chris
cskidd1983@gmail.com
Married to the amazing Sarah and raising Jakey, Daniel, Amelia, Josh & Jonah in our blended family. Passionate for Jesus, social work & sport.

0 thoughts on “Integration of youth ministry and adults”

  1. Chap Clark talks in depth about this issue in the chapter entitled “The Myth of the Perfect Youth Ministry Model” in “Starting Right.” In the chapter, he uses a funnel as a metaphor for channeling students in from the outside of the church to the inside.

    Chap says these levels (which he refers to as the entry level, discipleship/community building level, intimate relationships level, and assimilation/mentor level) move students strategically from one level to the next.

    Here are some ways I try to get students connected with the larger church body:

    1) Have the student ministry serve other ministries in the church.

    2) Encourage student leaders to participate in ministries other than the student ministry.

    3) Expose them to other youth groups and parachurch organizations, to help them realize the Body of Christ is bigger than just our church.

    Chap is also big on making sure the strategy is two-way. We as youth leaders cannot force the church to assimilate these kids, we need to lead the church to receive students into the body.

  2. I think integration is where we must go. I tried to involve adults in the congregation in praying for the young people, even or more especially if they weren’t directly involved. When our church had a series of Bible study evenings I took the young people to it. At the church fundraisers we ran a stall. We ran events to raise money for their youth holiday and invited all the adults. I am also a strong advocate of not having teenagers out of the main Sunday service. We used to sit together int he service then have some teen time afterwards. It didn’t work for all the teens but having at least some of the young people there worked with the rest of the community as they could see they were there and knew them by name not just as “the young people”.
    Now I’m advising churches on working with young people I’m really trying to get people to go for integration from the outset but it always has to related to the individual church.
    There was that book by Jason Garnder too called Mend the Gap? Not read it but have it on my list!

  3. Chap Clark talks in depth about this issue in the chapter entitled "The Myth of the Perfect Youth Ministry Model" in "Starting Right." In the chapter, he uses a funnel as a metaphor for channeling students in from the outside of the church to the inside.

    Chap says these levels (which he refers to as the entry level, discipleship/community building level, intimate relationships level, and assimilation/mentor level) move students strategically from one level to the next.

    Here are some ways I try to get students connected with the larger church body:

    1) Have the student ministry serve other ministries in the church.

    2) Encourage student leaders to participate in ministries other than the student ministry.

    3) Expose them to other youth groups and parachurch organizations, to help them realize the Body of Christ is bigger than just our church.

    Chap is also big on making sure the strategy is two-way. We as youth leaders cannot force the church to assimilate these kids, we need to lead the church to receive students into the body.;. All the best!!

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